The #PWChat series rolled on with another informative discussion with co-host Linda Girgis, MD.

We discussed where we now stand with TrumpCare since the version we knew a year ago is essentially dead, reactions to Pres. Trump’s touting in his 1st State of the Union address (Jan 30, 2018) of the FDA’s approval of more drugs last year than any other year on record, his plan to decrease prescription drug prices, the impact on the US healthcare systems as a whole, as well as on patients and healthcare professionals, and more!

View our upcoming schedule, or read our other #PWChat recaps here.

Below are the highlights from the chat. You can read the full transcript here.

Editor’s note: some of Dr. Girgis’ numerical responses do not match the question asked, but each response listed under the question is the correct answer.

 

 

 

 

Question 1

Q1: A year ago, we were wondering if TrumpCare would replace #ACA / #ObamaCare, but TrumpCare, as we knew it then, is dead. So, where do we stand now?#PWChat

— Physician’s Weekly (@physicianswkly) February 6, 2018

A1. Seems we are stuck and everyone has given up on doing anything to fix the healthcare system. #PWchat https://t.co/vynFEnqzoB

— Linda Girgis, MD (@DrLindaMD) February 6, 2018

Q1 standing the same place as one year ago, just getting by amidst much talk and little listening to all the speakers. #PWchat

— ElizabethKelly, Ph.D (@Elizabe85727641) February 6, 2018

Question 2

Q2: In the #SOTU last week, @realDonaldTrump touted @US_FDA approving more drugs last year than any other year & his plan to decrease Rx prices & get more terminally ill patients into trials of experimental drugs. What’s your take on all 3 of these?#PWChat

— Physician’s Weekly (@physicianswkly) February 6, 2018

A2. The pharmaceutical companies still control the prices and the insurance companies still control what they will cover. Who is going to pay for that? #PWchat https://t.co/xM0m9zGdXr

— Linda Girgis, MD (@DrLindaMD) February 6, 2018

Q2 Nothing, these actions result from a great deal of interaction of the many rather than the few. #PWchat

— ElizabethKelly, Ph.D (@Elizabe85727641) February 6, 2018

A2 The US healthcare system seems labyrinthine; almost impossible to turn around, but you have to try #pwchat

— Liam Farrell (@drlfarrell) February 6, 2018

A2 The costs are incredible from this side of the pond; is it true healthcare cause thousands of bankruptcies every year? #pwchat

— Liam Farrell (@drlfarrell) February 6, 2018

Question 3

Q3: A few days ago, Alex Azar (@SecAzar) took office as Secretary of @HHSgov. What will his impact be on US healthcare as a whole, as well as on patients and healthcare professionals specifically?#PWChat

— Physician’s Weekly (@physicianswkly) February 6, 2018

Q3 healthy profits? #pwchat

— Matthew Loxton (@mloxton) February 6, 2018

My thoughts exactly! #PWchat https://t.co/Yfl2TxVKPd

— Linda Girgis, MD (@DrLindaMD) February 6, 2018

Question 4

Q4: What are the pros & cons of @SpeakerRyan’s Patient’s Choice Act? Where does this plan stand, and what would result if it came to be law?#PWChat

— Physician’s Weekly (@physicianswkly) February 6, 2018

Q4 Pro: comfortable fee for service, good profits. Con: increased morbidity and mortality, decreased access, worse health outcomes. #pwchat

— Matthew Loxton (@mloxton) February 6, 2018

Question 5

Q5: What will come of @realDonaldTrump’s administration allowing states (as of January 11) to impose work requirements on #Medicaid recipients?#PWChat

— Physician’s Weekly (@physicianswkly) February 6, 2018

Q5 Some states, especially those above the $1 line will leap at it, even though it saves no money and devastates the vulnerable who rely on the program. #PWChat pic..com/qJICU7MUh2

— Matthew Loxton (@mloxton) February 6, 2018

A3. There will be too much backlash from states. I don’t see it happening. #PWchat https://t.co/O8IjvtDWoz

— Linda Girgis, MD (@DrLindaMD) February 6, 2018

A5 It may help slightly, for those who become employed & gain insurance. But many will still rely on Medicaid because of low income. #PWChat

— Becky Brandt RN (@bbhomebody) February 6, 2018

Question 6

Q6: The #Obamacare tax on those who don’t get health insurance was repealed w/ @realDonaldTrump’s Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, removing the incentive for healthy people to get health insurance. What will result from this?#PWChat

— Physician’s Weekly (@physicianswkly) February 6, 2018

A4. As it was, patients were getting insurance that didn’t pay much due to high deductibles. However, insurance companies will lose the revenue from that source driving up premiums. #PWchat https://t.co/dU99stY7Bv

— Linda Girgis, MD (@DrLindaMD) February 6, 2018

Q6 probably less than we fear, but will probably cause premiums to climb as insurers try to calculate the risk of a death spiral #PWChat

— Matthew Loxton (@mloxton) February 6, 2018

Q6 An increase in the health literacy rate, fear & anger from individuals toward the HC system > decrease in the health status of many, weaker work force, increase in public health issues #PWchat

— ElizabethKelly, Ph.D (@Elizabe85727641) February 6, 2018

Question 7

Q7: An executive order signed by @realDonalTrump on Oct 12, 2017 modified #ObamaCare in 5 ways. First, it directs @SecretaryAcosta , Sec of Labor, to expand access to association health plans. What does this mean & what will come of it?#PWChat

— Physician’s Weekly (@physicianswkly) February 6, 2018

A5. The attempt is to expand insurance choices and competition. Nothing will happen just by signing an order. Need to get participating parties on board #PWchat https://t.co/ZqM7Xy5Skr

— Linda Girgis, MD (@DrLindaMD) February 6, 2018

Question 8

Q8: The same executive order also requests @SecretaryAcosta to ease restrictions on short-term health plans & allow employers to use pretax $ for “health reimbursement arrangements”. What will come of these requests?#PWChat

— Physician’s Weekly (@physicianswkly) February 6, 2018

A8. It can provide some relief but I don’t see it changing the landscape at all. #PWchat https://t.co/jii6dNFsWw

— Linda Girgis, MD (@DrLindaMD) February 6, 2018

A8 Sounds like high deductible major medical plans may be offered again at lower rates and employers get the equivalent of a Medical spending account. #PWChat https://t.co/nYzFYVYsaw

— Becky Brandt RN (@bbhomebody) February 6, 2018

Question 9

Q9: The @realDonalTrump order also commissions a study to find ways to limit consolidation w/in insurance & hospital industries, and it directs agencies to find additional means to increase competition & choice in healthcare. What does that all mean for patients & HCPs?#PWChat

— Physician’s Weekly (@physicianswkly) February 6, 2018

A9. It could give patients more choices in services. However, insurance companies are not necessarily forced to offer or cover more choices. #PWchat https://t.co/Rmfbjrvlgu

— Linda Girgis, MD (@DrLindaMD) February 6, 2018

Question 10

Q10: What has resulted from @realDonalTrump ending reimbursement to insurers who waived deductibles & copayments for low-income customers, & what’s the Alexander-Murray plan?#PWChat

— Physician’s Weekly (@physicianswkly) February 6, 2018

A10. To be honest, I haven’t seen any difference on the frontlines. It is a plan that includes subsidies for insurance companies in order to make plans comparable to #Obamacare plans, cost-wise. #PWchat https://t.co/Bb2DmNviEh

— Linda Girgis, MD (@DrLindaMD) February 6, 2018

Question 11

OK, last question

Q11: How would a full #Obamacare /#ACA repeal affect patients AND #healthcare professionals?#PWChat

— Physician’s Weekly (@physicianswkly) February 6, 2018

A11. You can’t just pull out without a back-plan in place. Pts depend on having coverage in place. Pts w/ chronic dz will no longer get medical treatment. #PWchat https://t.co/0kebQ2OKog

— Linda Girgis, MD (@DrLindaMD) February 6, 2018

A11. Doctors are contracted with insurers. When that falls through, those patients become unisnured and many cannot afford to pay out-of-pocket. Our business is cut. #PWchat https://t.co/0kebQ2OKog

— Linda Girgis, MD (@DrLindaMD) February 6, 2018