Physician’s Weekly, along with Greg Wells, PhD, co-hosted the second part of the #PWChat series on how to help patients make sense of all the exercise-related information found online and elsewhere.

You can read the full recap of Part I here.

The discussion focused on examples of exercise fads that clinicians should steer their patients away from, exercise suggestions that physicians should be making for their patients, and much more!

You can view our upcoming schedule, or read our other #PWChat recaps here.

Don’t forget to check back for updates on Part III of this #PWChat, set for January 10 at 3:00PM Eastern.

 

 

Question 1

Q1: What are your thoughts on flexibility training? Pros and cons?#PWChat #bebetter

— Physician’s Weekly (@physicianswkly) November 1, 2017

1/2 Needed- especially if your sport/activity creates imbalances (most do w/ predictable ones) –>#PWChat

— Nicholas DiNubile MD (@drnickUSA) November 1, 2017

Exactly. A good example being that cyclists can benefit tremendously from hip flexor mobility work. Activation before workout, static post.

— Dr. Greg Wells (@drgregwells) November 1, 2017

2/2 Also kids around growth spurts(gumby turns tight) & aging athletes(collagen more brittle-needs BOTH warm up and some stretching) #PWChat

— Nicholas DiNubile MD (@drnickUSA) November 1, 2017

Q1. I’m a very big fan of flexibility training. Also known as mobility training. There is a lot of confusion about pros and cons. #PWChat

— Dr. Greg Wells (@drgregwells) November 1, 2017

Q1 Static stretching (putting a muscle on stretch and holding for 15+ sec) can be helpful post-workout. #PWChat

— Dr. Greg Wells (@drgregwells) November 1, 2017

Q1. Here is another great TED talk on the topic of stretching by Dr. David Behm from Memorial University: https://t.co/1V2sDbPpm0 #PWChat

— Dr. Greg Wells (@drgregwells) November 1, 2017

I like warm-up (get blood flowing to nooks & crannies) then dynamic stretching before sport/activity. Especially my #tennis #PWChat

— Nicholas DiNubile MD (@drnickUSA) November 1, 2017


Question 2

Since we’ve brought it up
Q2: #Yoga seems to have exploded in popularity. Good, bad or neither? what about #HotYoga?#PWChat #bebetter

— Physician’s Weekly (@physicianswkly) November 1, 2017

X-training w/ #yoga provides the much needed flexibility & “balance” for most. And also learn important relaxation breathing #PWChat

— Nicholas DiNubile MD (@drnickUSA) November 1, 2017

So True! And it creates amazing core strength through relatively simple measures. 👍#PWchat

— Becky Brandt RN (@bbhomebody) November 1, 2017

Yes, one of our wives at PW is a #yogi / children’s #yoga instructor & is constantly talking about benefits of “finding your breath”#PWChat https://t.co/LkkhfyGyoJ

— Physician’s Weekly (@physicianswkly) November 1, 2017

31-day revolution is a fantastic way for beginners to get started: https://t.co/nWa0UP8B5D#PWChat https://t.co/JLC8bxBJmW

— Physician’s Weekly (@physicianswkly) November 1, 2017

 


Question 3

Q3: How can clinicians help patients cut through all the noise on the internet about latest #exercise / #fitness fads?#PWChat #bebetter

— Physician’s Weekly (@physicianswkly) November 1, 2017

Keep it simple. Walk and move daily. Avoid prolonged sitting. Sweat a few times each week. Move in nature. Do activities you enjoy. #PWChat

— Dr. Greg Wells (@drgregwells) November 1, 2017

The answer is so simple its almost confusing. Consistency over time is so critical. Movement of any kind has benefits. Integrate into life.

— Dr. Greg Wells (@drgregwells) November 1, 2017

A3- Pts need to understand that real fitness/exercise WILL REQUIRE SOME EFFORT. Fads may claim otherwise #PWChat

— Becky Brandt RN (@bbhomebody) November 1, 2017

Have often toyed with idea of writing up a spec sheet of what pts want in a health app. Vendors all seem to miss the plot somewhat

— Matthew Loxton (@mloxton) November 1, 2017