On Tuesday, June 18, Physician’s Weekly continued its discussion on racial/ethnic microaggressions in healthcare with its Tweetchat (#PWChat).

Part I was hosted on May 21, and you can see the full recap here.

Below are the highlights from the chat. You can read the full transcript here, by scrolling down to the corresponding responses.

Click here for a look at our #PWChat schedule and recaps.

 

 

Question 4

Q4: If you have been a target of #microaggression based on your race or ethnicity, what tools & resources have you used to cope? If you have not been a target, what tools & resources have you known others to use?#PWChat pic..com/aVeOfFvcUq

— Physician’s Weekly (@physicianswkly) June 18, 2019

A4. I have debriefed with family/friends. Depending on how safe the environment is (and depending on who the person who dealt the microaggression is), I have actually brought it up with that person directly using me-first language “I felt xyz when you said abc” #PWChat

— Jasmine R Marcelin, MD (@DrJRMarcelin) June 18, 2019

A4. I have debriefed with family/friends. Depending on how safe the environment is (and depending on who the person who dealt the microaggression is), I have actually brought it up with that person directly using me-first language “I felt xyz when you said abc” #PWChat

— Jasmine R Marcelin, MD (@DrJRMarcelin) June 18, 2019

#PWChat The word Microagression was not on my vocabulary until 1 year ago, when I learned about it in #HELI2018.
Things that I know others use are: Asking questions: e.g. – What do you mean by that?.

— Maria Mora-Pinzon, MD (@MariaCMoraP) June 18, 2019

A4 – I’ve obviously never faced microaggressions based on race, just my immigrant status and gender – I usually clearly ask someone to repeat what they said. #pwchat learned a LOT about this topic at Brave Enough conference. #BE19 @RUBraveEnough

— A Solberg MD, Interventional Specialist (@AgnesSolberg) June 18, 2019

A4: Bystander technique: “y’know, I recently learned that some people interpret term X to have a racial connotation, because of the way it was used in the past to refer to Y. Now that I know the historical context, I try to remember not to use term X! What do you think?” #PWChat

— Ana Safavi, MD (@ana_safavi) June 18, 2019

A4 – I have not been a target based on race or ethnicity, but when I am aware of it occurring with my team at work, I do my best to be an #upstander not a #bystander. I also try to debrief afterwards w the team & get advice from others. #PWChat

— Kelly Cawcutt MD MS (@KellyCawcuttMD) June 18, 2019

 

 

Question 5

Q5: How would you want a (generally supportive or well-meaning) colleague or supervisor who is accused of #microaggression (the microaggressor) to respond both in real time and after the incident?#PWChat pic..com/gsgX4lCuYL

— Physician’s Weekly (@physicianswkly) June 18, 2019

A5. In real time, at least an acknowledgement that “this is not okay” to whomever said whatever they said, so that I don’t feel alone. Afterwards, I would definitely want a debrief. as soon as possible after the incident. This helps reduce the social isolation #PWChat

— Jasmine R Marcelin, MD (@DrJRMarcelin) June 18, 2019

A5: Accusations can be jarring, especially when self-awareness is scarce. We must give people time to process these new ideas without criminalizing them. This will encourage more upstanding. #PWChat

— Kaishauna Guidry, MD (@DrMamaKai) June 18, 2019

A5. I guess I would want them to understand that the time for racial comments or comments based on gender etc is long gone and that we no longer will take such abuse or belittling. I want them to also understand how ignorant this is and to stop and if genuine apologize. #PWChat

— Katrin Rabiei, MD PhD FEBNS (@DrKatrin_Rabiei) June 18, 2019

A5 I would love immediate recognition and recanting 🥰but I’ll take delayed acknowledgement. If it’s sincere that’s how to maintain trust in the relationship. #pwchat

— Tania K. Arora, MD (@TaniaKArora) June 18, 2019

 

 

Question 6

Q6: Did you receive formal training as a medical student, resident, fellow, or attending on how to handle #microaggression in the clinical setting? Was the training useful? If so what specific tools did you learn about?#PWChat pic..com/It0Huc5lof

— Physician’s Weekly (@physicianswkly) June 18, 2019

A6 – Not specifically on #microaggressions. All training I have had now has been through conferences, webinars, personal reading, discussions w colleagues & #SoMe. #PWchat

— Kelly Cawcutt MD MS (@KellyCawcuttMD) June 18, 2019

A6. No. My “education” comes from #some and colleagues voicing it like @divadocsbos. #PWChat

— Katrin Rabiei, MD PhD FEBNS (@DrKatrin_Rabiei) June 18, 2019

A6. Check out @OhioState Kirwan Institute resources while researching for a paper and for my workshops on unconscious bias and diversity/inclusion: https://t.co/bt6gJlMcKx #PWChat

— Jasmine R Marcelin, MD (@DrJRMarcelin) June 18, 2019

A6: Definitely not. AFAIK, we don’t even receive legally mandated training on our med school’s own harassment policy! (The hospitals are way better at this than the med schools are… ) #PWChat

— Ana Safavi, MD (@ana_safavi) June 18, 2019