Under New Guidelines, Half of Americans Have Unhealthy, High Blood Pressure

Under New Guidelines, Half of Americans Have Unhealthy, High Blood Pressure

Nearly half of U.S. adults now have high blood pressure, thanks to a new definition of what constitutes high: 130/80 is the new 140/90. That means that 103 million people — about 14% more than under the old definition — need to make diet and exercise changes and, in some cases, take medication to lower their risk of heart attack or stroke. These new blood pressure guidelines, the first major update since 2003, were announced November 13 at the American Heart Association’s annual scientific sessions and published in Hypertension and the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. “It’s very clear that lower is better,” said Paul Whelton of Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine in New Orleans, lead author of the guidelines, at a news conference. Previous studies have linked low blood pressure with low risk of cardiovascular disease. The updated recommendations “will improve the cardiovascular health of our adult community in the United States,” Whelton said. Click here to read key points to in the 2017 Guideline for the Prevention, Detection, Evaluation, and Management of High Blood Pressure in...
First Brain Training Exercise Positively Linked to Dementia Prevention Identified

First Brain Training Exercise Positively Linked to Dementia Prevention Identified

Aging research specialists have identified, for the first time, a form of mental exercise that can reduce the risk of dementia. The cognitive training, called speed of processing, showed benefits up to 10 years after study participants underwent the mental exercise program, said Frederick W. Unverzagt, PhD, professor of psychiatry at Indiana University School of Medicine. The proportion of participants who underwent the training and later developed dementia was significantly smaller than among those who received no cognitive training, the researchers said. There were measurable benefits even though the amount of training was small and spread out over time: 10 one-hour sessions over six weeks initially and up to eight booster sessions after that. “We would consider this a relatively small dose of training, a low intensity intervention. The persistence — the durability of the effect was impressive,” said Dr. Unverzagt, who explains more in a Q&A blog post. Results from the Advanced Cognitive Training in Vital Elderly — ACTIVE — study of 2,802 older adults were recently reported in Alzheimer & Dementia Translational Research and Clinical Interventions, a peer-reviewed journal of the Alzheimer’s Association. The researchers, from IU, the University of South Florida, Pennsylvania State University and Moderna Therapeutics, examined healthy adults aged 65 years and older from multiple sites and who were randomly assigned to one of four treatment groups: Participants who received instructions and practice in strategies to improve memory of life events and activities. Participants who received instruction and practice in strategies to help with problem solving and related issues. Participants who received computer-based speed of processing exercises — exercises designed to increase the amount and...
Some Cancer Therapies May Provide a New Way to Treat High Blood Pressure

Some Cancer Therapies May Provide a New Way to Treat High Blood Pressure

Drugs designed to halt cancer growth may offer a new way to control high blood pressure (hypertension), say Georgetown University Medical Center investigators. The finding could offer a real advance in hypertension treatment because although a number of high blood pressure drugs are now available, they work by different mechanisms that are not suited for all patients. The study, published in the journal Hypertension, found that fibroblast growth factors, or FGFs, involved in increasing blood vessel growth so that cancer can grow, also have a systemic effect on blood pressure. The study suggests that just as oncologists use FGF inhibitors to control cancer, clinicians may be able to use FGF inhibitors to regulate blood pressure and control disease associated with hypertension. “It’s rare that a single class of drugs can be used for such different conditions, but that is what our study strongly suggests,” says the study’s senior investigator, Anton Wellstein, MD, PhD, professor of oncology and pharmacology at Georgetown University School of Medicine and a researcher at Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center. Wellstein and his collaborators previously found that the FGF pathway, when switched on, drives growth of blood vessels that feed a growing tumor (angiogenesis). The development of FGF inhibitors is based in part on their ability to inhibit angiogenesis. The current study took a deeper dive into the pathway and found that a protein, FGFBP1, modulates FGF. The gene that produces FGFBP1 to regulate FGF is known as FGF binding protein 1. Click here to read more info on this...
#PWChat Recap – Ketamine for Depression: Exciting but Controversial

#PWChat Recap – Ketamine for Depression: Exciting but Controversial

Physician’s Weekly continued its #PWChat series on Thursday, Nov. 16, with Steven P. Levine, MD, on the use of ketamine to treat depression. The discussion focused on why there is a need for alternatives to antidepressants, like ketamine, for treating depression, how ketamine, a psychedelic club drug, ever became even a possibility for the treatment of depression, what makes ketamine a promising alternative to antidepressants and other standard depression care, and much more. You can view our upcoming schedule, or read our other #PWChat recaps here. Below are the highlights from the chat. You can read the full transcript here.     Question 1 OK, let’s get this thing started: Q1: Why is there a need for alternatives to antidepressants, such as #ketamine, for treating #depression?#PWChat — Physician’s Weekly (@physicianswkly) November 17, 2017 A1: Millions of people suffer from #depression each year, and the current options just don’t work very well. Many don’t benefit, they take too long to work, and side effects are difficult. #ketamine can be a quick, effective, and safe option. #PWchat — KetamineTreatment SF (@ActifyNeuro) November 17, 2017 For 8 years I did traditional mood stabilizers and antidepressants. I was just trading one set of symptoms for another #PWChat — Bell HopeFlower (@BHopeflower) November 17, 2017 Because a third of mentally ill patients don’t respond to the current offerings in psychiatry. Furthermore, when someone is suicidal, they can’t wait 4-6 weeks to see if a medication will work which it might not. It saves lives! #PWChat — Ketamine Saved Me (@KetamineSavedMe) November 17, 2017 Question 2 Q2: How did #ketamine, a psychedelic club drug, ever become even a...
Gut Microbes Can Protect Against High Blood Pressure

Gut Microbes Can Protect Against High Blood Pressure

The MIT team, working with researchers in Germany, found that in both mice and humans, a high-salt diet shrinks the population of a certain type of beneficial bacteria. As a result, pro-inflammatory immune cells called Th-17 cells grow in number. These immune cells have been linked with high blood pressure, although the exact mechanism of how they contribute to hypertension is not yet known. The researchers further showed that treatment with a probiotic could reverse these effects, but they caution that people should not interpret the findings as license to eat as much salt as they want, as long as they take a probiotic. “I think certainly there’s some promise in developing probiotics that could be targeted to possibly fixing some of the effects of a high-salt diet, but people shouldn’t think they can eat fast food and then pop a probiotic, and it will be canceled out,” says Eric Alm, director of MIT’s Center for Microbiome Informatics and Therapeutics and a professor of biological engineering and civil and environmental engineering at MIT. Alm, Dominik Muller of the Max-Delbruck Center for Molecular Medicine in Berlin, and Ralf Linker of Friedrich-Alexander University in Erlangen, Germany, are the senior authors of the study, which appears in the Nov. 15th issue of Nature. The paper’s lead author is Nicola Wilck of the Max-Delbruck Center for Molecular Medicine. Authors from MIT include graduate students Mariana Matus and Sean Kearney, and recent PhD recipient Scott Olesen. Click here to read the full press...
Know Your ICD-10 Code

Know Your ICD-10 Code

ICD-10, which is the 10th revision of the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, contains codes for diseases, signs and symptoms, abnormal findings, complaints, social circumstances, and external causes of injury or diseases. There are currently 68,000 ICD-10 codes, compared to only 14,000 ICD-9 codes. So many of these new codes, however, can seem obscure when pertaining to medical injuries. Believe it or not, these are actual ICD-10 codes in the newest version. Below is one of the newer, stranger codes:   Unspecified balloon accident injuring occupant, sequela  ...
FDA Approves Pill with Sensor that Digitally Tracks if Patients have Ingested their Medication

FDA Approves Pill with Sensor that Digitally Tracks if Patients have Ingested their Medication

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved the first drug in the U.S. with a digital ingestion tracking system. Abilify MyCite (aripiprazole tablets with sensor) has an ingestible sensor embedded in the pill that records that the medication was taken. The product is approved for the treatment of schizophrenia, acute treatment of manic and mixed episodes associated with bipolar I disorder and for use as an add-on treatment for depression in adults. The system works by sending a message from the pill’s sensor to a wearable patch. The patch transmits the information to a mobile application so that patients can track the ingestion of the medication on their smart phone. Patients can also permit their caregivers and physician to access the information through a web-based portal. “Being able to track ingestion of medications prescribed for mental illness may be useful for some patients,” said Mitchell Mathis, M.D., director of the Division of Psychiatry Products in the FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research. “The FDA supports the development and use of new technology in prescription drugs and is committed to working with companies to understand how technology might benefit patients and prescribers.” It is important to note that Abilify MyCite’s prescribing information (labeling) notes that the ability of the product to improve patient compliance with their treatment regimen has not been shown. Abilify MyCite should not be used to track drug ingestion in “real-time” or during an emergency because detection may be delayed or may not occur. Click here to read the full press...
Exercise Increases Brain Size, New Study Shows

Exercise Increases Brain Size, New Study Shows

In a first of its kind international collaboration, researchers from Australia’s National Institute of Complementary Medicine at Western Sydney University and the Division of Psychology and Mental Health at the University of Manchester in the UK examined the effects of aerobic exercise on a region of the brain called the hippocampus, which is critical for memory and other brain functions. Brain health decreases with age, with the average brain shrinking by approximately 5% per decade after the age of 40. Studies in mice and rats have consistently shown that physical exercise increases the size of the hippocampus but until now evidence in humans has been inconsistent. The researchers systematically reviewed 14 clinical trials which examined the brain scans of 737 people before and after aerobic exercise programs or in control conditions. The participants included a mix of healthy adults, people with mild cognitive impairment such as Alzheimer’s and people with a clinical diagnosis of mental illness including depression and schizophrenia. Ages ranged from 24 to 76 years with an average age of 66. The researchers examined effects of aerobic exercise, including stationary cycling, walking, and treadmill running. The length of the interventions ranged from three to 24 months with a range of 2-5 sessions per week. Overall, the results — published in the journal NeuroImage — showed that, while exercise had no effect on total hippocampal volume, it did significantly increase the size of the left region of the hippocampus in humans. Click here to read more about...
Breakthrough in Fibrotic Diseases that Cause Organ Failure

Breakthrough in Fibrotic Diseases that Cause Organ Failure

Researchers from Duke-NUS Medical School (Duke-NUS) and the National Heart Centre Singapore (NHCS) have discovered that a critical protein, known as interleukin 11 (IL11) is responsible for fibrosis and causes organ damage. While it is surprising that the importance of IL11 has been overlooked and misunderstood for so long, it has now been very clearly demonstrated by this work. A protein known as transforming growth factor beta 12 (“TGFB1”) has long been known as the major cause of fibrosis and scarring of body organs, but treatments based on switching off the protein have severe side effects. The scientists discovered that IL11, is even more important than TGFB1 for fibrosis and that IL11 is a much better drug target than TGFB1. The international team, led by Professor Stuart Cook, Tanoto Foundation Professor of Cardiovascular Medicine, along with Assistant Professor Sebastian Schäfer, both from NHCS and Duke-NUS’ Programme in Cardiovascular and Metabolic Disorders, carried out the translational research to identify the key drivers of chronic fibrotic disease in heart, kidney, and other tissues. The team also includes researchers from Harvard University and University of California, San Diego/UCSD (USA), Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine/MDC-Berlin (Germany), London Institute of Medical Sciences/MRC-LMS and Imperial College London (the UK), and the University of Melbourne (Australia). Click here to read the press...
Engineering Non-Immune Cells to Kill Cancer Cells

Engineering Non-Immune Cells to Kill Cancer Cells

Researchers have reprogrammed normal human cells to create designer immune cells capable of detecting and destroying cancer cells. researchers have recently used T-cells engineered in the laboratory to combat tumours. Modified to include additional functions, these immune cells can hunt down and kill cancer cells. Unfortunately, however, such immune cell therapies can have significant side-effects. On top of that, the production of modified T-cells is technically challenging. Now a team of researchers led by ETH Professor Martin Fussenegger from the Department of Biosystems Science and Engineering (D-BSSE) in Basel has come up with an innovative and simplified approach for producing therapeutically effective synthetic designer cells to combat cancer. The researchers have built three additional components into human renal cells and (adipose) stem cells, thereby transforming them into synthetic designer cells that mimic T-cells. One of the components of synthetic T-cells entails molecular antennae protruding well outside the membrane. Also embedded within the cell membrane are antibodies with specific docking sites, which can sense the target structures of the cancer cell and bind to them. The third component is a gene network that generates a molecule complex. This molecule complex comprises a molecular “warhead” that penetrates the membrane of the target cell. It is linked to a converter molecule that activates an anti-cancer substance in the tumour cell’s interior. The precursor of this active substance needs to be added to the system externally. Cancer cells absorb this substance, and the converter module transforms it from an inactive to inactive state. The cancer cells bursts, the active substance is released and destroys other tumour cells in the “death zone” around the...
Common Genetic Fusion Event May Be Associated with Low-Risk Prostate Cancer

Common Genetic Fusion Event May Be Associated with Low-Risk Prostate Cancer

Establishing the way in which a genetic alteration called a TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion forms in a prostate cancer, rather than the presence of the gene fusion itself, could help identify patients with prostate cancer with a low risk of spreading, which might determine the best course of treatment for the patient. This new research by John C. Cheville, MD, professor of pathology at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, has been published inCancer Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research. A Gleason score provides information on how aggressive a prostate cancer is. It is calculated when a prostate needle biopsy specimen is examined under a microscope. Depending on how normal or abnormal the cancer looks, it is assigned a number from 1 to 5, with 5 being the most abnormal and most aggressive. Different areas of a tumor may have different patterns, and the two highest patterns are added together to give the Gleason score. Most prostate cancers are Gleason score 6 (composed entirely of pattern 3) and men with Gleason score 6 are considered at low risk of having their tumors progress. Cheville explained that active surveillance is a common approach to caring for patients with prostate cancer with a Gleason score of 6. Men on active surveillance receive no treatment and are followed. Some of these men are later found to have clinically significant disease that requires treatment. Identifying a biomarker that, in addition to Gleason score, distinguishes men at increased risk for disease progression from those whose prostate cancer never becomes a clinically significant problem could help improve patient care, added Cheville. To...
Osteoporosis-Related Bone Fractures Linked to Air Pollution

Osteoporosis-Related Bone Fractures Linked to Air Pollution

Exposure to air pollution is associated with osteoporosis-related loss of bone mineral density and risk of bone fractures, according to a new study by researchers at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health. Their findings are published in The Lancet Planetary Health. The researchers are the first to document high rates of hospital admissions for bone fractures in communities with elevated levels of ambient particulate matter (PM2.5), a component of air pollution, with risk of bone fracture admissions greatest in low-income communities. The findings, from a study of osteoporosis-related fracture hospital admissions among 9.2 million Medicare enrollees in the Northeast/Mid-Atlantic between 2003-2010, suggest that even a small increase in PM2.5 concentrations would lead to an increase in bone fractures in older adults. A concurrent analysis of eight years of follow-up among 692 middle-aged, low-income adults in the Boston Area Community Health/Bone Survey cohort found that participants living in areas with higher levels of PM2.5 and black carbon, a component of air pollution from automotive emissions, had lower levels of parathyroid hormone, a key calcium and bone-related hormone, and greater decreases in bone mineral density than those exposed to lower levels of these pollutants. Click here to read the full press...
Talking to Patients About High Quality and Potential Cost-Savings of Generic Medications

Talking to Patients About High Quality and Potential Cost-Savings of Generic Medications

From 2005 to 2014, generic drugs saved the U.S. health care system 1.68 trillion dollars. Additionally, generics routinely cost 30 to 80 percent less than their brand-name counterparts. While generic drugs can clearly offer substantial cost savings to patients, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recognizes that some patients do not understand what a generic drug is and often resist accepting them in place of their brand-name counterparts. To help physicians talk to their patients about the safety and effectiveness of generic drugs, the FDA has created a range of new and updated education materials including fact sheets, videos, an App and other resources which can be found on the FDA website. FDA-approved generic drugs are required to meet rigorous FDA standards for safety, quality, and effectiveness. The standards are equally demanding whether the FDA is reviewing brand-name or generic drugs. Physicians can find out if a generic version of a brand-name medication is available by using the FDA database [email protected], which includes a catalog of FDA-approved drugs. Physicians can also search the online version (or use the smartphone app) of the “Orange Book.” For very recent generic drug approvals, healthcare professionals can consult the “First Generics List” on the FDA website. Information on the FDA website that physicians can use to talk to their patients includes: FDA-approved generic drugs listed in the FDA resource known as the Orange Book along with their brand-name counterparts for which they can be substituted. A generic drug has no significant differences from the brand-name drug. Any generic drug must provide the same therapeutic effect as the brand-name drug and must be...
Immune Cells Mistake Heart Attacks for Viral Infections

Immune Cells Mistake Heart Attacks for Viral Infections

By using single cell RNA Seq, an emerging technique that combines microfluidic nanoliter droplet reactors with single cell barcoding and next generation sequencing, the researchers were able to examine expression of every gene in over 4,000 cardiac immune cells and found the specialized IFNIC population of responsible cells. A study led by Kevin King, a bioengineer and physician at the University of California San Diego, has found that the immune system plays a surprising role in the aftermath of heart attacks. The research could lead to new therapeutic strategies for heart disease. The team, which also includes researchers from the Center for Systems Biology at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, and the University of Massachusetts, presented the findings in the Nov. 6 issue of Nature Medicine. Ischemic heart disease is the most common cause of death in the world and it begins with a heart attack. During this process, heart cells die, prompting immune cells to enter the dead tissue, clear debris and orchestrate stabilization of the heart wall. Click here to read more about this press...
Deadly Lung Cancers Are Driven By Multiple Genetic Changes

Deadly Lung Cancers Are Driven By Multiple Genetic Changes

A new UC San Francisco-led study challenges the dogma in oncology that most cancers are caused by one dominant “driver” mutation that can be treated in isolation with a single targeted drug. Instead, the new research finds one of the world’s most deadly forms of lung cancer is driven by changes in multiple different genes, which appear to work together to drive cancer progression and to allow tumors to evade targeted therapy. These findings — published online on November 6, 2017 in Nature Genetics — strongly suggest that new first-line combination therapies are needed that can treat the full array of mutations contributing to a patient’s cancer and prevent drug resistance from arising. “Currently we treat patients as if different oncogene mutations are mutually exclusive. If you have an EGFR mutation we treat you with one class of drugs, and if you have a KRAS mutation we pick a different class of drugs. Now we see such mutations regularly coexist, and so we need to adapt our approach to treatment,” said Trever Bivona, MD, PhD, a UCSF Medical Center oncologist, associate professor in hematology and oncology, and member of the Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center at UCSF. Click here to read the full press...
New System for Treating Colorectal Cancer Can Lead to Complete Cure

New System for Treating Colorectal Cancer Can Lead to Complete Cure

Until now, radioimmunotherapy (targeted therapy) of solid tumors using antibody-targeted radionuclides has had limited therapeutic success. “This research is novel because of the benchmarks reached by the treatment regimen, in terms of curative tumor doses, with non-toxic secondary radiation to the body’s normal tissues,” explains Steven M. Larson, MD, and Sarah Cheal, PhD, of Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. “The success in murine tumor models comes from the unique quality of the reagents developed by our group, and the reduction to practice methodology, including a theranostic approach that can be readily transferred, we believe, to patients.” Theranostics, a term derived from therapy and diagnostics, is the use of a single agent to both diagnose and treat disease. The theranostic agent first finds the cancer cells, then destroys them, leaving healthy cells unharmed — minimizing side effects and improving quality of life for patients. In this study, the glycoprotein A33 (GPA33), an antigen found on over 95 percent of primary and metastatic human colorectal cancers, was targeted with a bispecific antibody for A33 tumor antigen and a second antibody for a small-molecule radioactive hapten, a complex of lutetium-177 (177Lu) and S-2-(4-aminobenzyl)1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane tetra-acetic acid (177Lu-DOTA-Bn). The DOTA-pretargeted radioimmunotherapy (PRIT) strategy was tested on a mouse model. In randomly selected mice undergoing treatment, serial SPECT/CT imaging was used to monitor treatment response and calculate radiation-absorbed doses to tumors. All the DOTA-PRIT-treated animals tolerated the treatment well, and all 9 assessed mice had no trace of cancer remaining upon microscopic examination. There was also no detectable radiation damage to critical organs, including bone marrow and kidneys. The 100-percent cure rate in the mouse...
New Pathway for Handling Stress Discovered

New Pathway for Handling Stress Discovered

Researchers at the University of California San Diego studying how animals respond to infections have found a new pathway that may help in tolerating stressors that damage proteins. Naming the pathway the Intracellular Pathogen Response or “IPR,” the scientists say it is a newly discovered way for animals to cope with certain types of stress and attacks, including heat shock. The study, published Nov. 2 in Current Biology, was led by Kirthi Reddy in the lab of Emily Troemel, a professor in the Cell and Developmental Biology Section in UC San Diego’s Division of Biological Sciences. The researchers studied how roundworms (C. elegans) regulate expression of genes that are turned on by infection with microsporidia, which are natural intracellular pathogens of worms as well as humans. “The species of microsporidia we study only grows inside the intestine of the worm — it can’t grow outside,” said Troemel. “C. elegans has a transparent body plan, which facilitates watching microsporidia, how it grows and what it does to host cells. Most recently we’ve focused on how C. elegans turns on IPR genes in response to microsporidia and heat stress.” During the study, genetic screening revealed the identity of pals-22, a gene used by roundworms to regulate IPR pathway gene expression. Roundworm mutants of pals-22 always have IPR genes on, which causes increased tolerance of heat shock and other types of stress. These IPR effects appear to be independent of previously described pathways. The researchers say the discovery has implications for many diseases related to protein accumulation since comparable genes can often be linked in humans. Click here to read more about this...
Scientists Identify Mechanism that Helps People Inhibit Unwanted Thoughts

Scientists Identify Mechanism that Helps People Inhibit Unwanted Thoughts

Scientists have identified a key chemical within the ‘memory’ region of the brain that allows us to suppress unwanted thoughts, helping explain why people who suffer from disorders such as anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, and schizophrenia often experience persistent intrusive thoughts when these circuits go awry.   We are sometimes confronted with reminders of unwanted thoughts — thoughts about unpleasant memories, images or worries. When this happens, the thought may be retrieved, making us think about it again even though we prefer not to. While being reminded in this way may not be a problem when our thoughts are positive, if the topic was unpleasant or traumatic, our thoughts may be very negative, worrying or ruminating about what happened, taking us back to the event. “Our ability to control our thoughts is fundamental to our wellbeing,” explains Professor Michael Anderson from the Medical Research Council Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit at the University of Cambridge. “When this capacity breaks down, it causes some of the most debilitating symptoms of psychiatric diseases: intrusive memories, images, hallucinations, ruminations, and pathological and persistent worries. These are all key symptoms of mental illnesses such as PTSD, schizophrenia, depression, and anxiety.” Professor Anderson likens our ability to intervene and stop ourselves retrieving particular memories and thoughts to stopping a physical action. “We wouldn’t be able to survive without controlling our actions,” he says. “We have lots of quick reflexes that are often useful, but we sometimes need to control these actions and stop them from happening. There must be a similar mechanism for helping us stop unwanted thoughts from occurring.” Click here...
Blood-Clotting Protein Prevents Repair in the Brain

Blood-Clotting Protein Prevents Repair in the Brain

Picture a bare wire, without its regular plastic coating. It’s exposed to the elements and risks being degraded. And, without insulation, it may not conduct electricity as well as a coated wire. Now, imagine this wire is inside your brain. That’s what happens in many diseases of the nervous system, such as multiple sclerosis (MS), spinal cord injuries, stroke, neonatal brain injuries, and even Alzheimer’s disease. Much like that bare wire, the nerve fibers in the brain lose their protective coating, called myelin, and become extremely vulnerable. This leaves the nerve cells exposed to their environment and reduces their ability to transmit signals quickly, resulting in impaired cognition, sensation, and movement. In disease, the brain seems to activate mechanisms to repair myelin, but cannot complete the process. For years, scientists have been trying to understand why these repair mechanisms are halted, as overcoming this obstacle holds great potential for treating disabling neurological diseases. Katerina Akassoglou, PhD, and her research team at the Gladstone Institutes uncovered a promising new therapeutic strategy. Surprisingly, it’s associated with a protein in the blood. They found that when fibrinogen (a blood-clotting protein) leaks into the central nervous system, it stops brain cells from producing myelin and, as a result, prevents repair. Click here to read more about this...
#PWChat Recap – Exercise as Medicine: PART II

#PWChat Recap – Exercise as Medicine: PART II

Physician’s Weekly, along with Greg Wells, PhD, co-hosted the second part of the #PWChat series on how to help patients make sense of all the exercise-related information found online and elsewhere. You can read the full recap of Part I here. The discussion focused on examples of exercise fads that clinicians should steer their patients away from, exercise suggestions that physicians should be making for their patients, and much more! You can view our upcoming schedule, or read our other #PWChat recaps here. Don’t forget to check back for updates on Part III of this #PWChat: Date TBD.     Question 1 Q1: What are your thoughts on flexibility training? Pros and cons?#PWChat #bebetter — Physician’s Weekly (@physicianswkly) November 1, 2017 1/2 Needed- especially if your sport/activity creates imbalances (most do w/ predictable ones) –>#PWChat — Nicholas DiNubile MD (@drnickUSA) November 1, 2017 Exactly. A good example being that cyclists can benefit tremendously from hip flexor mobility work. Activation before workout, static post. — Dr. Greg Wells (@drgregwells) November 1, 2017 2/2 Also kids around growth spurts(gumby turns tight) & aging athletes(collagen more brittle-needs BOTH warm up and some stretching) #PWChat — Nicholas DiNubile MD (@drnickUSA) November 1, 2017 Q1. I’m a very big fan of flexibility training. Also known as mobility training. There is a lot of confusion about pros and cons. #PWChat — Dr. Greg Wells (@drgregwells) November 1, 2017 Q1 Static stretching (putting a muscle on stretch and holding for 15+ sec) can be helpful post-workout. #PWChat — Dr. Greg Wells (@drgregwells) November 1, 2017 Q1. Here is another great TED talk on the topic of stretching by Dr. David Behm...
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