Conference Highlights: American Academy of Dermatology 2018

Conference Highlights: American Academy of Dermatology 2018

  Gene Expression Test Impacts Melanoma Management The DecisionDX-Melanoma is a 31-gene expression profile (GEP) test designed to identify high-risk stage I and II melanoma patients based on biological information from 31 genes within their tumor tissue. For a prospective multicenter study, 247 stage I (181) and stage II (66) patients were enrolled at 15 dermatology, surgical oncology, and medical oncology centers. Participants had clinical management plans documented after their melanoma diagnosis and then underwent 31-GEP tests, after which changes in management plans were documented. DecisionDX-Melanoma resulted in a change in clinical management in nearly 49% of cases, with changes occurring most frequently in patients who were identified as being at high risk of metastasis.   Aggressive Skin Cancer Rates Skyrocketing Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) incidence rates are rising and strongly age-associated, relevant for an aging population. A team of researchers sought to determine MCC incidence in the United States and project incident cases through the year 2025. Registry data were obtained from the SEER-18 Database, containing 6,600 MCC cases. From 2000 to 2013, the number of reported solid cancer cases increased 15%, melanoma cases increased 57%, and MCC cases increased 95%. In 2013, the MCC incidence rate was 0.7 cases/100,000 person-years in the US, corresponding to 2,488 cases/year. MCC incidence increased exponentially with age, from 0.1 to 1.0 to 9.8 (per 100,000 person-years) among age groups 40-44 years, 60-64 years, and ≥85 years, respectively. Due to aging of the Baby Boomer generation, US MCC incident cases are predicted to climb to 2,835 cases/year in 2020 and 3,284 cases/year in 2025.   Acne More Harmful than Melanoma? For the...
First Blood Test to Help Diagnose Brain Injuries Gets US Approval

First Blood Test to Help Diagnose Brain Injuries Gets US Approval

The first blood test to help doctors diagnose traumatic brain injuries has won US government approval. The move means Banyan Biomarkers can commercialize its test, giving the company an early lead in the biotech industry’s race to find a way to diagnose concussions. The test doesn’t detect concussions and the approval won’t immediately change how patients with suspected concussions or other brain trauma are treated. But Wednesday’s green light by the Food and Drug Administration “is a big deal because then it opens the door and accelerates technology,” said Michael McCrea, a brain injury expert at Medical College of Wisconsin. The test detects two proteins present in brain cells that can leak into the bloodstream following a blow to the head. Banyan’s research shows the test can detect them within 12 hours of injury. It’s designed to help doctors quickly determine which patients with suspected concussions may have brain bleeding or other brain injury. Click here to read the full...
Bacteria Play Critical Role in Driving Colon Cancers

Bacteria Play Critical Role in Driving Colon Cancers

Patients with an inherited form of colon cancer harbor two bacterial species that collaborate to encourage development of the disease, and the same species have been found in people who develop a sporadic form of colon cancer, a study led by a Johns Hopkins Bloomberg~Kimmel Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy research team finds. A second study in mice published concurrently by the same researchers shows a possible mechanism behind how one of these species spurs a specific type of immune response, promoting — instead of inhibiting — the formation of malignant tumors. Together, these findings could lead to new ways to more effectively screen for and ultimately prevent colon cancer, a disease that kills more than 50,000 people each year in the U.S. and is on the rise among younger adults age 20 to 50. The complementary findings were published online Feb. 1 in Cell Host & Microbe and in the Feb. 2 issue of Science. Click here to read the full press...
#PWChat Recap: 1-Year Follow-Up on Healthcare Under President Trump

#PWChat Recap: 1-Year Follow-Up on Healthcare Under President Trump

The #PWChat series rolled on with another informative discussion with co-host Linda Girgis, MD. We discussed where we now stand with TrumpCare since the version we knew a year ago is essentially dead, reactions to Pres. Trump’s touting in his 1st State of the Union address (Jan 30, 2018) of the FDA’s approval of more drugs last year than any other year on record, his plan to decrease prescription drug prices, the impact on the US healthcare systems as a whole, as well as on patients and healthcare professionals, and more! View our upcoming schedule, or read our other #PWChat recaps here. Below are the highlights from the chat. You can read the full transcript here. Editor’s note: some of Dr. Girgis’ numerical responses do not match the question asked, but each response listed under the question is the correct answer.         Question 1 Q1: A year ago, we were wondering if TrumpCare would replace #ACA / #ObamaCare, but TrumpCare, as we knew it then, is dead. So, where do we stand now?#PWChat — Physician’s Weekly (@physicianswkly) February 6, 2018 A1. Seems we are stuck and everyone has given up on doing anything to fix the healthcare system. #PWchat https://t.co/vynFEnqzoB — Linda Girgis, MD (@DrLindaMD) February 6, 2018 Q1 standing the same place as one year ago, just getting by amidst much talk and little listening to all the speakers. #PWchat — ElizabethKelly, Ph.D (@Elizabe85727641) February 6, 2018 Question 2 Q2: In the #SOTU last week, @realDonaldTrump touted @US_FDA approving more drugs last year than any other year & his plan to decrease Rx prices & get more terminally ill...
Are Edible QR Codes the Medicine of the Future?

Are Edible QR Codes the Medicine of the Future?

For the last 100 years, researchers have constantly pushed the boundaries for our knowledge about medicine and how different bodies can respond differently to it. However, the methods for the production of medicine have not yet moved itself away from mass production. Many who have a given illness get the same product with equal amount of an active compound. This production might soon be in the past. In a new study, researchers from the University of Copenhagen together with colleagues from Åbo Akademi University in Finland have developed a new method for producing medicine. They produce a white edible material. Here, they print a QR code consisting of a medical drug. “This technology is promising, because the medical drug can be dosed exactly the way you want it to. This gives an opportunity to tailor the medication according to the patient getting it,” says Natalja Genina, Assistant Professor at Department of Pharmacy. The shape of a QR code also enables storage of data in the “pill” itself. Click here to read more about this new...
Low Muscle Strength Identified as Early Risk Factor for ALS

Low Muscle Strength Identified as Early Risk Factor for ALS

Low muscle strength during the later teen years has been identified as a risk factor for much later onset of the neurological disease known as ALS, or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. A study at Sahlgrenska Academy, Sweden, published in the Journal of Neurology also links low blood counts at a young age to ALS. The researchers studied Swedish military enlistment data for more than 1.8 million (1,819,817) men in the 1968-2005 period as well as data from the Swedish health care register and mortality register. The majority were 18 years old at the time of enlistment. The follow-up time was up to 46 years. The group included 526 individuals who developed ALS, a disease that usually occurs after age 50 and involves a successive degradation of the nerves that control muscles. There is no cure, and in most cases patients die after two to five years. The current study confirms the impression that ALS can be associated with a relatively low body mass index (BMI), even at a young age. The differences, however, were not dramatic. Those who developed ALS had an average BMI of 21.1, compared with 21.9 for the group as a whole. Click here to read the full press...
Disparities Discovered in Management of Brain Metastases

Disparities Discovered in Management of Brain Metastases

Management of brain metastases typically includes radiotherapy (RT) with conventional fractionation and/or stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). For the 20% of cancer patients who will develop brain metastases, optimal practice patterns for SRS remain unclear. To assess optimal treatment of this patient population, Benjamin Kann, MD, and colleagues conducted a study–published in the Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network–that examined patients who were diagnosed with metastatic non–small cell lung cancer, breast cancer, colorectal cancer, or melanoma from 2004 to 2014 who received upfront brain RT. Nearly 76,000 patients were examined, among whom 16.1% received SRS. The proportion of patients who received SRS annually increased from 9.8% to 25.6%, and the proportion of facilities using SRS annually increased from 31.2% to 50.4%. Upon multivariable analysis, non-Caucasian race, non-private insurance, and residence in lower-income or less-educated regions predicted lower SRS use. During the study period, SRS use increased disproportionally among patients with private insurance and those who resided in higher-income or higher-educated regions. From 2004 to 2013, 1-year actuarial survival improved from 24.1% to 49.6% for patients selected for SRS and from 21.0% to 26.3% for non-SRS patients. “It’s a combination of factors,” Dr. Kann says of the disparities, “including up-front costs, the infrastructure involved, multidisciplinary expertise with radiation oncologists and neurosurgeons, and training required. The study highlights the need to improve access to some of these lower-income and under-privileged populations. There’s a clear correlation between level of insurance and use of this modality.” Dr. Kann says that further research is needed to determine the reasons for these worsening disparities and their clinical implications on quality of life and survival for patients...
#PWChat Recap: Healthcare Predictions/Expectations for 2018

#PWChat Recap: Healthcare Predictions/Expectations for 2018

The #PWChat series continued with another informative discussion with co-host Linda Girgis, MD, on the biggest predictions and expectations in healthcare for 2018. Topics discussed included predicted healthcare legislation changes and their potential impact(s), whether patients will be better or worse off than in previous years and why, why increases in both type and size of medical epidemics have been predicted for 2018, what, if anything can be done to avoid them, and what their impacts would be, and much more! View our upcoming schedule, or read our other #PWChat recaps here. Below are the highlights from the chat. You can read the full transcript here.     Question 1 Q1: What changes to healthcare legislation are predicted for 2018, and what would the impact(s) be if predictions hold true?#PWChat — Physician’s Weekly (@physicianswkly) January 31, 2018 A1. Expect MIPS to ramp up and small practices facing negative adjustments. Increase cost to large practices to continue compliance. #PWchat https://t.co/87NbmCpjPR — Linda Girgis, MD (@DrLindaMD) January 31, 2018 A1 There is a push to make so called “Abled body” #Medicaid members work. So many patients like me suffer from invisible illnesses that it’s going to hurt us. I look abled but am not! #PWChat — Alan Brewington (@abrewi3010) January 31, 2018 A1 There is a push to make so called “Abled body” #Medicaid members work. So many patients like me suffer from invisible illnesses that it’s going to hurt us. I look abled but am not! #PWChat — Alan Brewington (@abrewi3010) January 31, 2018 A1 Reduction of ONC budgets thereby setting back interoperability efforts that would help coordinate better care #PWChat — ShereeseM, MS/MBA...
Oral Health May Have an Important Role in Cancer Prevention

Oral Health May Have an Important Role in Cancer Prevention

The bacteria that cause periodontitis, a disease affecting the tissues surrounding the teeth, seems to play a part also in the onset of pancreatic cancer, say the researchers at the University of Helsinki and the Helsinki University Hospital, Finland, and the Karolinska Institutet, Sweden. The researchers have investigated the role of bacteria causing periodontitis, an inflammation of the tissues surrounding the teeth, in the development of oral cancers and certain other cancers, as well as the link between periodontitis and cancer mortality on the population level. The study, published in the British Journal of Cancer, has for the first time proven the existence of a mechanism on the molecular level through which the bacteria associated with periodontitis, Treponema denticola (Td), may also have an effect on the onset of cancer. Researchers found that the primary virulence factor of the Td bacteria, the Td-CTLP proteinase (an enzyme), occurs also in malignant tumors of the gastrointestinal tract, for example, in pancreatic cancer. Click here to read more about this...
Biodegradable Sensor Could Help Doctors Monitor Serious Health Conditions

Biodegradable Sensor Could Help Doctors Monitor Serious Health Conditions

UConn engineers have created a biodegradable pressure sensor that could help doctors monitor chronic lung disease, swelling of the brain, and other medical conditions before dissolving harmlessly in a patient’s body. The UConn research is featured in the current online issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The small, flexible sensor is made of medically safe materials already approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for use in surgical sutures, bone grafts, and medical implants. It is designed to replace existing implantable pressure sensors that have potentially toxic components. Those sensors must be removed after use, subjecting patients to an additional invasive procedure, extending their recovery time, and increasing the risk of infection. Click here to read more about this...
Improving Stroke Treatment Through Machine Learning

Improving Stroke Treatment Through Machine Learning

Methods from optogenetics and machine learning should help improve treatment options for stroke patients. Researchers from Heidelberg University have developed a computer vision technique to analyze the changes in motor skills that result from targeted stimulation of healthy areas of the brain. Movements recorded with a video camera are automatically analyzed to monitor the rehabilitation process and evaluate and adjust the optogenetic stimulation. Researchers from the Interdisciplinary Center for Scientific Computing (IWR) in Heidelberg worked with neurobiologists from Switzerland to develop the method.   Along with speech and vision problems, motor paralyzes are the most common symptoms post-stroke. According to lead author Dr Dr Anna-Sophia Wahl, a neuroscientist at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH) in Zurich, neurorehabilitation is the only treatment option for the majority of stroke victims. “Many approaches in basic science and in the clinic aim to trigger regeneration processes post-stroke by stimulating healthy brain regions of indeterminate size. However, we use optogenetics to systematically stimulate certain unaffected areas of the brain so that they sprout connections into the damaged hemisphere in order to assume its functions.” So-called corticospinal circuits from the cerebral cortex to the spinal cord are specifically activated. Click here to read more about this...
Researchers Find More Evidence of Link Between Severe Gum Disease and Cancer Risk

Researchers Find More Evidence of Link Between Severe Gum Disease and Cancer Risk

Data collected during a long-term health study provides additional evidence for a link between increased risk of cancer in individuals with advanced gum disease, according to a new collaborative study led by epidemiologists Dominique Michaud at Tufts University School of Medicine and Elizabeth Platz of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and Kimmel Cancer Center. The study, published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute, used data from comprehensive dental exams performed on 7,466 participants from Maryland, Minnesota, Mississippi, and North Carolina, as part of their participation in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study who were then followed from the late 1990s until 2012. During the follow-up period, 1,648 new cancer cases were diagnosed. The research team found a 24 percent increase in the risk of developing cancer among participants with severe periodontitis, compared to those with mild to no periodontitis at baseline. Among patients who had no teeth — which can be a sign of severe periodontitis — the increase in risk was 28 percent. The highest risk was observed in cases of lung cancer, followed by colorectal cancer. Click here to read the full press...
Power Stations in Cells May Protect Brain Against Parkinson´s

Power Stations in Cells May Protect Brain Against Parkinson´s

A Norwegian study shows that impairment in mitochondria may actually protect the brain in Parkinson’s disease. A new study from the University of Bergen (UiB), in Norway, in collaboration with the University of Cambridge, shows that the function of mitochondria, the microscopic powerhouses of the cell, is altered throughout the entire brain of individuals with Parkinson’s disease. Ominous as this may sound, it might actually not be deleterious for patients. “This new study shows that complex I deficiency is, in fact, a global phenomenon in the brain of persons with Parkinson’s disease, and is found indiscriminately in both affected and healthy brain regions. Intriguingly, brain cells (neurons) with decreased complex I levels are significantly less likely to contain Lewy bodies, the abnormal protein-aggregates that characterize Parkinson’s disease,” says researcher Charalampos Tzoulis at Department of Clinical Science, UiB. These discoveries suggest that, contrary to mainstream theory, mitochondrial complex I deficiency may not be entirely deleterious for the brain in Parkinson’s disease. Click here to read the full press...
New Technology Will Create Brain Wiring Diagrams

New Technology Will Create Brain Wiring Diagrams

A paper describing the work appears online in the December 12 issue of eLife. The research was done in the laboratory of Caltech research professor Carlos Lois. “If an electrical engineer wants to understand how a computer works, the first thing that he or she would want to figure out is how the different components are wired to each other,” says Lois. “Similarly, we must know how neurons are wired together in order to understand how brains work.” When two neurons connect, they link together with a structure called a synapse, a space through which one neuron can send and receive electrical and chemical signals to or from another neuron. Even if multiple neurons are very close together, they need synapses to truly communicate. The Lois laboratory has developed a method for tracing the flow of information across synapses, called TRACT (Transneuronal Control of Transcription). Using genetically engineered Drosophila fruit flies, TRACT allows researchers to observe which neurons are “talking” and which neurons are “listening” by prompting the connected neurons to produce glowing proteins. Click here to read more about this...
#PWChat Recap: Exercise as Medicine (Part III)

#PWChat Recap: Exercise as Medicine (Part III)

Physicians’ Weekly, along with Greg Wells, PhD, recently co-hosted the third installment of the #PWChat series on the topic of “Exercise as Medicine.” The topics covered include the types of exercise Dr. Wells would recommend for patients solely looking to lose weight who are otherwise healthy, the pros and cons of cross training, how to inspire patients who have the desire to get in shape with exercise but try something for a week or 2 and then fall back into a no-regular-exercise routine, and much more. If you missed any part of the previous discussions, you can read Part I and Part II. View our upcoming schedule, or read our other #PWChat recaps here. Below are the highlights from the chat. You can read the full transcript here.     Question 1 Q1: For patients solely looking to lose weight who are otherwise healthy, what types of #exercise would you recommend?#PWChat #bebetter — Physician’s Weekly (@physicianswkly) January 10, 2018 #PWChat Regular exercise is key. Success has been achieved with walking, swimming, cycling, weights, yoga. When we match regular exercise with healthy nutrition the benefits are amplified. Sleep is another factor that can help with weight loss and also helps people eat smarter. — Dr. Greg Wells (@drgregwells) January 10, 2018 #PWChat There is also good evidence to support the use of resistance exercise as a modality to help people decrease their fat mass. Important to differentiate between weight loss and fat loss. The goal should often be fat loss not necessarily weight loss. — Dr. Greg Wells (@drgregwells) January 10, 2018 HIT (High Intensity Training), if they can tolerate it. This seems...
Using AI Technology to Chart Immune Cell Receptor

Using AI Technology to Chart Immune Cell Receptor

Johns Hopkins scientists have used a form of artificial intelligence to create a map that compares types of cellular receptors, the chemical “antennas” on the surface of immune system T-cells. Their experiments with lab-grown mouse and human T-cells suggest that people with cancer who have a greater variety of such receptors may respond better to immunotherapy drugs and vaccines. A report on how the scientists created and tested what they call “ImmunoMap” appeared Dec. 20 in Cancer Immunology Research. “ImmunoMap gives scientists a picture of the wide diversity of the immune system’s responses to cellular antigens,” says Jonathan Schneck, M.D., Ph.D., professor of pathology, medicine and oncology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, and a member of the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center. Receptors on T-cells recognize antigens, or pieces of other cells that trigger an immune response, particularly antibodies. If the antigens are foreign, T-cells raise the alarm within the immune system, which can distribute an “all-points bulletin” to be on the lookout for the unfamiliar antigens. Because diseases such as cancer tend to evade detection by T-cells’ receptors, allowing a tumor to grow unchecked, scientists have long sought “intel” on this process as a means of developing therapies that target malignant cells, but leave healthy cells alone. “Much of immunotherapy today is built on the premise that we know these antigens,” says Johns Hopkins biomedical engineering M.D./Ph.D. student John-William Sidhom. “But we actually don’t know as much as we need to about them and the T-cells that recognize them.” Click here to read more about this...
Scientists Discover Molecule that Could Reverse Cellular Aging

Scientists Discover Molecule that Could Reverse Cellular Aging

Researchers at Instituto de Medicina Molecular (iMM) João Lobo Antunes have found that manipulating a single RNA molecule is enough to reverse cellular aging. Throughout time all cells age gradually, contributing to the development of several diseases. Inducing cellular regeneration is one of the strategies used to fight diseases associated with cellular aging. However, aged cells tend to be highly resistant to any type of manipulation intended to induce regeneration. Ribonucleic acid, or RNA, is responsible for protein synthesis inside cells. However, a specific type of molecule named non-coding RNA is never translated into protein. In fact, since the mapping of the human genome in 2001 it is known that only about 2% is actually translated into proteins. Now, the team led by Bruno de Jesus and Maria do Carmo-Fonseca, used a genetically modified mouse model to study cellular aging and regeneration. They found that cells derived from the skin of old mice produced higher amounts of a long non-coding RNA molecule named Zeb2-NAT when compared to cells from young mice. By reducing the amount of this specific RNA molecule, it was possible to efficiently regenerate old cells. “These results are an important step to be able to regenerate diseased tissues in older people,” said Bruno de...
New Biomarkers Predict Outcome of Cancer Immunotherapy

New Biomarkers Predict Outcome of Cancer Immunotherapy

Nowadays, melanoma and lung cancer can be combatted effectively through immunotherapy, which makes targeted use of the immune system’s normal function of regularly examining the body’s tissue for pathogens and damages. Specific inhibitors are used to activate immune cells in a way that makes them identify cancer cells as foreign bodies and eliminate them. This way, the immune system can boost its often weak immune response to allow it to even detect and destroy metastatic cancer cells. Immunotherapy thus makes it possible to control cancer cells in up to 50 percent of patients, in some cases even curing them altogether. However, around half of cancer patients do not respond to immunotherapy, but still have to put up with its side effects. A team of researchers from the University of Zurich and the UniversityHos-pital Zurich has now used a novel method to find out which patients are likely to respond positive-ly to immunotherapy. The researchers were able to identify biomarkers in the blood that indicate whether the therapy is highly likely to be effective even before treatment is commenced. Related Articles Omalizumab Ups Efficacy of Multifood Oral Immunotherapy Thyroid dysfunctions secondary to cancer immunotherapy “The blood counts of patients should be analyzed for these biomarkers when making a decision about immunotherapy. This will dramatically increase the share of patients who will benefit from this type of therapy,” says Professor Burkhard Becher from the Institute of Experimental Immunol-ogy at UZH. “At the same time, it makes it possible to directly move on to different methods in cases where immunotherapy won’t work — without losing valuable time.” The researchers worked hand in...
Inflammation Drives Progression of Alzheimer’s

Inflammation Drives Progression of Alzheimer’s

According to a study by scientists of the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE) and the University of Bonn now published in the journal Nature, inflammatory mechanisms caused by the brain’s immune system drive the progression of Alzheimer’s disease. These findings, which rely on a series of laboratory experiments, provide new insights into pathogenetic mechanisms that are believed to hold potential for tackling Alzheimer’s before symptoms manifest. The researchers envision that one day this may lead to new ways of treatment. Further institutions both from Europe and the US also contributed to the current results. “Deposition and spreading of Abeta pathology likely precede the appearance of clinical symptoms such as memory problems by decades. Therefore, a better understanding of these processes might be a key for novel therapeutic approaches. Such treatments would target Alzheimer’s at an early stage, before cognitive deficits manifest,” says Prof. Michael Heneka, a senior researcher at the DZNE and Director of the Department of Neurodegenerative Diseases and Gerontopsychiatry at the University of Bonn. An Inflammatory Cascade Prof. Heneka, who is also involved in the cluster of excellence “ImmunoSensation” at the University of Bonn, and coworkers have been investigating the role of the brain’s immune response in the progression of Abeta pathology for some time already. Previous work by the group that was published in Nature in 2013, had established that the molecular complex NLRP3, which is an innate immune sensor, is activated in brains of Alzheimer’s patients and contributes to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s in the murine model. NLRP3 is a so-called inflammasome that triggers production of highly pro-inflammatory cytokines. Furthermore, upon activation, NLRP3 forms large signaling complexes...
Erectile Dysfunction is Red Flag for Silent Early Cardiovascular Disease

Erectile Dysfunction is Red Flag for Silent Early Cardiovascular Disease

In addition to being an important health and quality of life issue for men, erectile dysfunction has long been associated with CV disease. Risk factors for erectile dysfunction and CV disease are similar — including older age, smoking, obesity, and diabetes, among others. In addition, multiple overlapping mechanisms lead to the development of both erectile dysfunction and CV disease. In the article entitled “The relationship of erectile dysfunction and subclinical cardiovascular disease: A systematic review and meta-analysis,” Drs. Chukwuemeka Osondu (Baptist Health South Florida), Bryan Vo (Florida International University), Ehimen Aneni (Mount Sinai Medical Center), and colleagues sought to establish erectile dysfunction as a simple and effective marker of underlying subclinical CV disease. They hypothesized that “measures of erectile dysfunction could be a simple effective CV disease risk stratification tool, particularly in young men who are less likely to undergo aggressive CVD risk assessment and management.” The authors conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of 28 studies that examined the link between erectile dysfunction and measures of early CV disease. They report a significant association of erectile dysfunction with impaired endothelial function (measured by brachial flow-mediated dilation using ultrasound), a marker of the ability of blood vessels to relax that is an early event in vascular disease development. In addition, the authors report that erectile dysfunction was associated with increased carotid intimal medial thickness (carotid IMT), an early manifestation of atherosclerosis. The results for the association of erectile dysfunction and coronary artery calcium scoring were inconclusive due to small number of studies with limited sample size. The authors identify this as an area in need of future study. Click...
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