Neurology

Three Effective Ways to Pick Quality Improvement Targets

Many quality improvement (QI) programs are less effective than they could be, because they have difficulty in selecting intervention targets that are meaningful to staff and which set achievement targets that do not seem to be arbitrary and imposed from above. This post sketches three approaches to initiating QI initiatives, and wraps them together in a way that staff may applaud.

Improving Stroke Treatment Through Machine Learning | News Brief

Methods from optogenetics and machine learning should help improve treatment options for stroke patients. Researchers from Heidelberg University have developed a computer vision technique to analyze the

Power Stations in Cells May Protect Brain Against Parkinson´s | News Brief

A Norwegian study shows that impairment in mitochondria may actually protect the brain in Parkinson’s disease. A new study from the University of Bergen (UiB), in Norway,

New Technology Will Create Brain Wiring Diagrams | News Brief

A paper describing the work appears online in the December 12 issue of eLife. The research was done in the laboratory of Caltech research professor Carlos Lois. “If

#PWChat: Healthcare Predictions/Expectations for 2018 | News Brief

Join us Wednesday, January 31 at 3:00pm ET for P our live, interactive tweetchat with Linda Girgis, MD, on the biggest predictions and expectations in healthcare for

Three Ineffective Institutional Approaches to Quality Improvement in Healthcare | Medical Blog

Three of the leading organizational obstacles to effectiveness of quality improvement in healthcare are related to lack of internalization, lack of management support, and a punitive management attitude toward error.

CME/CE: The Overuse of NSAIDs | Medical Blog

Research suggests that despite widespread use, NSAIDs appear to be associated with several side effects when misused or overused that may make use of these medications dangerous in certain populations and in combination with other drugs.

3-D Mini Brains Accelerate Research for Repairing Brain Function | News Brief

The Houston Methodist Research Institute is making mini brains from human stem cells that put researchers on a fast track to repair the nervous system after injury

Smartphone Addiction Creates Imbalance in Brain, Study Suggests | News Brief

Researchers have found an imbalance in the brain chemistry of young people addicted to smartphones and the internet, according to a study presented today at the annual

New Research Reveals High-Intensity Exercise Boosts Memory | News Brief

The health advantages of high-intensity exercise are widely known but new research from McMaster University points to another major benefit: better memory. The findings could have implications

First Brain Training Exercise Positively Linked to Dementia Prevention Identified | News Brief

Aging research specialists have identified, for the first time, a form of mental exercise that can reduce the risk of dementia. The cognitive training, called speed of

#PWChat – Why Doctors Are Losing the Public’s Trust | News Brief

Join us Wednesday, December 13 at 3:00pm ET for PART II of our live, interactive tweetchat with Linda Girgis, MD, based on her blog post on why

#PWChat Recap – Ketamine for Depression: Exciting but Controversial | Feature

Physician’s Weekly continued its #PWChat series on Thursday, Nov. 16, with Steven P. Levine, MD, on the use of ketamine to treat depression. The discussion focused on why

Bringing 3D-Printed Prosthetic Hands to Third-World Countries | Feature

3D printing is commonly used in first-world countries. However, 3D printing can be of added value in third-world countries as well. Prosthesis for children are normally handmade

Scientists Identify Mechanism that Helps People Inhibit Unwanted Thoughts | News Brief

Scientists have identified a key chemical within the ‘memory’ region of the brain that allows us to suppress unwanted thoughts, helping explain why people who suffer from

Blood-Clotting Protein Prevents Repair in the Brain | News Brief

Picture a bare wire, without its regular plastic coating. It’s exposed to the elements and risks being degraded. And, without insulation, it may not conduct electricity as

#PWChat Recap – Pseudoscience in Medicine: Steering Patients Toward Reliable References, Part II | News Brief

Dr. Linda Girgis, MD, FAAFP joined Physician’s Weekly to co-host Part II in our #PWChat series, on Wednesday, Oct. 25, on how to steer patients toward reliable resources when

Hospitals, Third Parties, and Physicians: Opposing Roles in Containing Healthcare Costs | Feature

Patients do not have carte blanche when it comes to decisions about their medical care. The type of insurance they have dictates which hospitals they must use,

#PWChat – Ketamine for Depression: Exciting but Controversial | Feature

Join us Thursday, November 16 at 9:00pm ET for a live, interactive tweetchat with Steven P. Levine, MD, on the use of ketamine to treat depression. Topics

MS Risk in Children Spotted with MRI Brain Scans | News Brief

By the time multiple sclerosis (MS) is diagnosed in children, it may be difficult to prevent the disabilities and relapses that come with the disease. In a

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