Recent Features

Reducing Obstructive Sleep Apnea Emergencies | Feature

Throughout the United States, rapid response systems (RRS) are commonly used safety protocols in hospitals that are designed to help decrease risks for the potentially fatal deterioration of patients.

Assessing Appropriate Use of Vascular Access Devices | Feature

The Michigan Appropriateness Guide to Intravenous Catheters has been developed to help clinicians appropriately select vascular access devices. These efforts are important to limiting the risk of complications in critically-ill patients.

#PWChat Recap: The Future of Medicaid Funding | Feature

The Physician’s Weekly #PWChat series continued with another informative discussion focusing on healthcare and, more specifically, medicaid funding. It was co-hosted by Dr. Linda Girgis, MD, FAAFP.

Physicians Practice: 7 Ways to Break Bad News to Patients | Feature

The author of this article is Linda Girgis MD, FAAFP, a family physician who practices in New Jersey. Dr. Girgis is also a regular blogger and columnist

Are doctors wimps? Hippocrates & Maimonides walk into a bar… | Feature

I was growling. Stacks of papers desecrated my desk. The EMR was giving me trouble. I began to curse ….suddenly…. There was a flash of lightening… In

Doctor and Patient Relationships: Empathy & Litigation | Feature

Research has shown that emergency physicians (EPs) with better interpersonal skills and who spend more time with patients appear to have fewer malpractice claims filed against them.

How has United Airlines done since the doctor was manhandled? | Feature

  Three months ago I blogged about the doctor who was dragged off a United plane in Chicago and the airline’s response to the incident. The CEO

Physicians Practice: How to Engage in Difficult Discussions With Staff | Feature

The author of this article is Catherine Hambley, PhD, an organizational psychologist who leverages brain science to promote effectiveness and positive change.  Of the many challenges physicians

A Closer Look at Leftover Pain Drugs | Feature

A survey has found that many parents hold onto their child’s leftover pain drugs. The findings highlight the need for healthcare providers to talk with parents and guide them on what to do with these medications after they are no longer needed.

Statin & Aspirin Use Post-CABG | Feature

CABG is among the most commonly performed procedures to treat ischemic heart disease, but previous research suggests that the long-term benefits of this surgery are limited by failed patency of bypass grafts.

#PWChat Recap: Defensive Medicine & Related Costs | Feature

The Physician’s Weekly #PWChat series continued last night with an energetic discussion focusing on defensive medicine and related costs. It was co-hosted by Jeff Segal, MD, JD,

Defining Operative Emergency General Surgery | Feature

A national study has found that the vast majority of all operative volume, complications, deaths, and costs associated with emergency general surgery are attributable to seven procedures. The findings may help hospitals focus prevention efforts and quality improvement initiatives.

Dr. MedLaw: Assumption of the Risk | Feature

“If a patient chooses to come to me for medical care and I explain the risks and they agree to the treatment then how can they turn around and sue me. Aren’t they agreeing to those risks?”

Postoperative Care With Online Portals | Feature

Online postoperative visits appear to be well accepted among patients and surgeons and tend to take less time to complete, according to a study. This approach also effectively identified patients who required further postoperative care.

Physicians Practice: 5 Ways for Physicians to be Role Models | Feature

The author of this article Sue Jacques, a professionalism expert who specializes in medical and corporate civility.  Physicians are expected to exemplify professional conduct and make smart

Managing Risk Associated with Contaminated Heater-Cooler Devices Used in Cardiac Surgery | Feature

Between 2010 and 2015, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) received 32 Medical Device Reports of patient infections associated with heater-cooler devices and 25 of these cases were reported during 2015 alone.

Making the Case for Suicide Screening in Emergency Departments | Feature

Universal suicide risk screening in the ED appears to be feasible and may increase the detection of people at risk, according to a study. EDs are encouraged to tailor suicide screening protocols to their available resources in order to optimize outcomes.

Follow-Up & Drug Adherence After Acute Myocardial Infarction | Feature

Older patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) appear to have poorer adherence to their post-discharge medication regimens if they go longer periods of time before being followed up. Delaying outpatient follow-up after AMI may worsen outcomes for this patient group.

Hernia Repair & Risk Reduction Programs | Feature

Previous research has shown that a significant proportion of patients who present to the hospital with a ventral hernia have modifiable risk factors, such as obesity, poor

Sex Bias in Surgical Research | Feature

A comprehensive analysis has found that sex bias appears to exist in human surgical clinical research. This disparity must be addressed in order to improve evidence-based medicine.

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