Recent Features

Going off the deep end about water | Feature

The latest water craze has generated a lot of discussion. The New York Times reported that some people in California [where else?] have started drinking “raw water”

#PWChat Recap: Exercise as Medicine (Part III) | Feature

Physicians’ Weekly, along with Greg Wells, PhD, recently co-hosted the third installment of the #PWChat series on the topic of “Exercise as Medicine.” The topics covered include the

Ordering unnecessary laboratory tests continues to be a problem | Feature

Unnecessary testing wastes money and can lead to further testing. Why does it occur? Almost 60% of medical personnel surveyed at a large academic medical center believed

Surgeon sued for talking on cell phone during an operation | Feature

A surgeon took a Spanish language proficiency test while performing varicose vein surgery on a 70-year-old woman. The doctor said he had to take the test during

OTC Medications for Diabetics: 7 Considerations | Feature

Many over-the-counter medications contain carbohydrates that can affect blood glucose levels in patients with diabetes. When recommending OTC medications to this patient population, clinicians can consider seven key points.

Why Doctors Are Losing the Public’s Trust | Feature

"The public is losing their trust in us. They see us as driven for profit. They feel we don’t listen to their concerns anymore and don’t care what they want or need."

Filing a Claim | Feature

View Cartoon “Press 1 to file a new claim. Press 2 to check on a claim. Press 3 to re-file a claim. Press 4 to scream in

Changing Behaviors in HIV-Infected Smokers | Feature

A meta-analysis suggests that targeted behavioral smoking cessation interventions appear to help HIV-infected smokers kick their habit. Patients who attend more sessions are more likely to succeed in quitting smoking.

#PWChat Recap: Why Doctors Are Losing the Public’s Trust, Part I | Feature

Physician’s Weekly co-hosted another informative discussion as part of the #PWChat series, with Linda Girgis, MD, based on her blog post on why doctors are losing the public’s trust.

#PWChat Recap: Why Doctors Are Losing the Public’s Trust, Part II | Feature

Physician’s Weekly co-hosted another installment of the #PWChat series on Wednesday, Dec. 13, with Linda Girgis, MD, based on her blog post on why doctors are losing the public’s

Patient satisfaction surveys are worthless | Feature

For several years, Medicare has tied hospital reimbursement to its definition of quality of care. Poorly performing hospitals can be penalized as much as 2% of their

#PWChat Recap: Diabetes Management in the Cardiovascular Outcome Trial Era | Feature

Physician’s Weekly co-hosted another installment of the #PWChat series on Monday, Nov. 27 to address diabetes management in the Cardiovascular Outcome Trial Era. Joined by former AACE president,

Statin Continuation Following an Adverse Event | Feature

Study results indicate that the benefits of statin therapy appear to outweigh the risks among high-risk patients. These agents should be continued even in the face of an adverse reaction in this patient population.

Key Changes to Biosimilar Reimbursement Policy | Feature

Smart changes to Medicare Reimbursement will mean a more competitive market and more options for patients.

#PWChat Recap – Ketamine for Depression: Exciting but Controversial | Feature

Physician’s Weekly continued its #PWChat series on Thursday, Nov. 16, with Steven P. Levine, MD, on the use of ketamine to treat depression. The discussion focused on why

Elective surgery ban for smokers and obese patients | Feature

The committee that plans and oversees medical care for the county of Hertfordshire, England announced recently that unless obese patients lose a specified amount of weight and

Can a handheld ultrasound replace your doctor? | Feature

    Dr. Mercola, described by Wikipedia as “an alternative medicine proponent, osteopathic physician, and web entrepreneur, who markets a variety of controversial dietary supplements and medical

Talking to Patients About High Quality and Potential Cost-Savings of Generic Medications | Feature

From 2005 to 2014, generic drugs saved the U.S. health care system 1.68 trillion dollars. Additionally, generics routinely cost 30 to 80 percent less than their brand-name

Beyond Late Night Calls: What Keeps Physicians Up at Night? | Feature

In television and movie medical dramas, there’s always that one scene in which a physician receives a call in the middle of the night—the one where the

A surgical resident’s legal battle with her program | Feature

  A surgical resident is suing St. Louis University, its surgical residency program director, and its trauma service chief for what she claims is an unjustified decision

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