Recent Features

CME/CE: HIV Transmission Risk During Antiretroviral Therapy | Feature

The risk for transmitting HIV appears to persist during the first 6 months of antiretroviral therapy (ART), according to a study. For those taking ART for less than 6 months, researchers observed that patients had incomplete viral suppression in blood and genital compartments.

#PWChat Recap – Hospitals, Not Hotels: A Look at Global Budgets | Feature

The Physician’s Weekly #PWChat series continued with another insightful discussion on Thursday, Aug. 26, focusing on on why hotels and hospitals shouldn’t necessarily be compared to one another and how

8 ways to prevent denials at your physician’s practice | Feature

  By Michelle Crawley Ask a physician about their biggest pain points when it comes to the physician billing process, and they’ll frequently mention denials. A denied

Guidance on Healthcare-Associated Ventriculitis & Meningitis | Feature

The Infectious Diseases Society of America has developed a guideline to help clinicians caring for patients with healthcare-associated ventriculitis and meningitis.

Age, Race, & Gender Differences in Pneumococcal Disease | Feature

Study results suggest that gender differences exist in rates of invasive pneumococcal disease among adults. These differences remain following the introduction of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines.

Smoking Cessation & Life Expectancy in HIV | Feature

Study results indicate that cigarette smoking has a substantial impact on the life expectancy of patients with HIV. However, smoking cessation appears to help regain some the years lost to smoking in this population.

Characterizing Operative Experiences of Pediatric Surgeons | Feature

A study has found that pediatric surgeons, once practicing, receive little exposure to many of the complex and rare cases for which they were trained. The findings raise important questions about maintaining competency for pediatric surgeons.

Delirium, Advanced Cancer, & ED Visits | Feature

Delirium is a serious cognitive disturbance in which patients have impaired thinking and awareness, and some studies suggest that the condition often goes unrecognized in EDs. “Few

Shared Decision Making in the ED | Feature

Physicians propose a new conceptual model to guide clinicians in determining when shared decision making is appropriate in the ED. They offer three factors that are necessary and sufficient to determine whether shared decision making should be pursued for a given clinical scenario.

Burnout: Gain Financial Independence & Retire Early | Feature

  by Alex Kilian Over seven years have passed since the Affordable Care Act was officially signed into law. At the time, the healthcare landscape had not

Is Outpatient Care Quality Improving Over Time? | Feature

More than a decade ago, landmark studies found that adults in the United States only received slightly more than half of the recommended healthcare services they should

Know Your ICD-10 Code | Feature

ICD-10, which is the 10th revision of the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, contains codes for diseases, signs and symptoms, abnormal findings, complaints,

Physicians Practice: 6 Ways to Streamline Job Interviews | Feature

The author of this article is Sue Jacques, a professionalism expert who specializes in medical and corporate civility. It is imperative to have a solid strategy when

Primary Hyperparathyroidism Guidelines | Feature

Primary hyperparathyroidism (pHPT) is a common clinical problem for which surgery has been deemed the only definitive treatment.

Reducing Obstructive Sleep Apnea Emergencies | Feature

Throughout the United States, rapid response systems (RRS) are commonly used safety protocols in hospitals that are designed to help decrease risks for the potentially fatal deterioration of patients.

Assessing Appropriate Use of Vascular Access Devices | Feature

The Michigan Appropriateness Guide to Intravenous Catheters has been developed to help clinicians appropriately select vascular access devices. These efforts are important to limiting the risk of complications in critically-ill patients.

#PWChat Recap: The Future of Medicaid Funding | Feature

The Physician’s Weekly #PWChat series continued with another informative discussion focusing on healthcare and, more specifically, medicaid funding. It was co-hosted by Dr. Linda Girgis, MD, FAAFP.

Physicians Practice: 7 Ways to Break Bad News to Patients | Feature

The author of this article is Linda Girgis MD, FAAFP, a family physician who practices in New Jersey. Dr. Girgis is also a regular blogger and columnist

Are doctors wimps? Hippocrates & Maimonides walk into a bar… | Feature

I was growling. Stacks of papers desecrated my desk. The EMR was giving me trouble. I began to curse ….suddenly…. There was a flash of lightening… In

Doctor and Patient Relationships: Empathy & Litigation | Feature

Research has shown that emergency physicians (EPs) with better interpersonal skills and who spend more time with patients appear to have fewer malpractice claims filed against them.

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