Why Doctors Are Losing the Public’s Trust

Why Doctors Are Losing the Public’s Trust
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Linda Girgis, MD

 

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Dr. Linda Girgis MD, FAAFP, is a family physician in South River, New Jersey. She holds board certification from the American Board of Family Medicine and is affiliated with St. Peter’s University Hospital and Raritan Bay Hospital. Dr. Girgis earned her medical degree from St. George’s University School of Medicine. She completed her internship and residency at Sacred Heart Hospital, through Temple University and she was recognized as intern of the year. Over the course of her practice, Dr. Girgis has continued to earn awards and recognition from her peers and a variety of industry bodies, including: Patients’ Choice Award, 2011-2012, Compassionate Doctor Recognition, 2011-2012. Dr. Girgis’ primary goal as a physician remains ensuring that each of her patients receives the highest available standard of medical care.

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Linda Girgis, MD (click to view)

Linda Girgis, MD

 

DrLindaMD-300dpi-3125x4167 (2)Like What You’re Reading?

Get Dr. Linda’s New Book!
Inside Our Broken Healthcare System

Dr. Linda Girgis MD, FAAFP, is a family physician in South River, New Jersey. She holds board certification from the American Board of Family Medicine and is affiliated with St. Peter’s University Hospital and Raritan Bay Hospital. Dr. Girgis earned her medical degree from St. George’s University School of Medicine. She completed her internship and residency at Sacred Heart Hospital, through Temple University and she was recognized as intern of the year. Over the course of her practice, Dr. Girgis has continued to earn awards and recognition from her peers and a variety of industry bodies, including: Patients’ Choice Award, 2011-2012, Compassionate Doctor Recognition, 2011-2012. Dr. Girgis’ primary goal as a physician remains ensuring that each of her patients receives the highest available standard of medical care.

Follow Dr. Linda Girgis, MD, FAAFP: Website | Twitter |

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"The public is losing their trust in us. They see us as driven for profit. They feel we don’t listen to their concerns anymore and don’t care what they want or need."
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We’ll discuss this blog post, and more, with Dr. Girgis in a live #PWChat TweetChat at 3:00pm (ET) on November 30, 2017! Stay tuned for details!

 

In my mind, the doctor-patient relationship is sancrosanct. There is no relationship where the bond of trust should be so strong, outside of matrimony. As physicians, patients rely on us to help them make life-saving decisions. And we need patients to be honest with us so that we can give the highest quality medical advice. Yet, there has been an erosion in this relationship over recent years. Doctors are no longer held in such high esteem as they were decades ago. Even our own Commander-in-Chief, President Obama, alluded to the fact that doctors have financial incentive to do more surgeries. The public is losing their trust in us. They see us as driven for profit. They feel we don’t listen to their concerns anymore and don’t care what they want or need.

Why has the public lost trust in doctors?

♦  Third parties are often making decisions. For example, they dictate their own formularies, and we often have our hands tied as to what medications we can prescribe. I often have patients ask me for the “strong Stuff.” They don’t realize that doctors are limited in prescribing habits, and we are not withholding the Best medications. But, we are the ones in direct contact with the patient.

♦  Outlier doctors have been gaming the system. Most doctors truly put patients’ care first, before profit. But, there are a few who inappropriately use their medical degrees for profit. Just look at Dr. Oz trying to get rich promoting weight loss products with no proven benefit. These doctors make us all look bad.

♦  There are many mandates imposed on us that affect patient care. One example is meaningful use. Doctors now have to document many metrics, inputting data into our EHR systems, in order to meet requirements. Patients take this lack of eye-to-eye contact as a sign that we are more interested in their digital record than them. They feel we are no longer listening to them. They don’t realize that we don’t want to be doing this. It has been opposed on us from on high, and we will be penalized if we don’t.

♦  HMO’s have greatly cut reimbursements to doctors. In order for practices to stay afloat financially, we have to see more patients. We need to find more and more room to see these extra patients if we want to stay afloat. Patients feel this and take it as an indication that we are pushing them through for profit and don’t care about them.

♦  Media tends to portray doctors in a bad light. There are big stories about the pill mill doctors and those arrested for fraud or harassment. There are so many more amazing stories of heroic doctors around than the bad apples. But the press does not give them attention. People rather see the bad than the good. This too tends to paint us all in a negative light.

Medical diseases are becoming more complex, and people are living longer. There has never been a time where patients need to trust their doctors more. All doctors need to remember their oath and put the patient back in center focus. We all need to take a stand against those doctors who are abusing the system for their own gain. Patients need to learn that the vast majority us care about our patients and have their best interests in mind. We all need to become a team again. Patients need to regain our trust, and our profession needs to re-establish its integrity.

 

DrLindaMD-300dpi-3125x4167 (2)Like What You’re Reading?

Get Dr. Linda’s New Book!
Inside Our Broken Healthcare System

Dr. Linda Girgis MD, FAAFP, is a family physician in South River, New Jersey. She holds board certification from the American Board of Family Medicine and is affiliated with St. Peter’s University Hospital and Raritan Bay Hospital. Dr. Girgis earned her medical degree from St. George’s University School of Medicine. She completed her internship and residency at Sacred Heart Hospital, through Temple University and she was recognized as intern of the year. Over the course of her practice, Dr. Girgis has continued to earn awards and recognition from her peers and a variety of industry bodies, including: Patients’ Choice Award, 2011-2012, Compassionate Doctor Recognition, 2011-2012. Dr. Girgis’ primary goal as a physician remains ensuring that each of her patients receives the highest available standard of medical care.

Follow Dr. Linda Girgis, MD, FAAFP: Website | Twitter |

48 Comments

  1. I think a little common sense and a lot of self education will tell you that magic bullets are a profit making pipe dream. Solving the complexities of disease resolution can not be addressed from the simplistic reductionist approaches that have become the cornerstone of allopathic medicine. I’m done with conventional medicine.

    Reply
  2. The oft used line, “Half of what we know is wrong, we just don’t know what half” is sage, particularly with regards to modern medicine. It is a widely held belief that medical practitioners over prescribe medication and unnecessary procedures, often with the best intentions, based on flawed science and to justify their existence.

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  3. I wouldn’t say say we have lost trust in Doctors, but that we have become more
    aware of good doctors and bad, My Mother and Father at 86, do everything the Doc. says, or refers to. They were given new Oncologists to see, I told them the Doctor they had been did’t have a very good rating based on Patient reviews. They said they were going cause the doctor said so. I look first for the best Doc. I can Find for my care. After all What do you call a Doc. who is in the lower 15% of his Class, Doctor. Sure there out for the money, but the insurance companies lie to them too. Some Doctors do not care, and that shows in their bed side manner.

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  4. The main reason the public has lost trust in doctors is how they ignore serious symptoms and tell people it’s in their head and nothing is wrong with them.

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    • Bang on, if someone needs and is asking for help almost on the knees but they are unhappy with there weight.. they should be put on a weight programme, not told your weight is fine do you want meds and here’s counselling.. lol waste of time money motives with evil lol I won’t stand in line, I was troubled by this I’m sure many others have stay strong 🙂

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    • That is my experience. This makes a patient have to become more aggressive, which makes the patient look like the problem. Just trying to get help!

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    • I can’t find a regular medical dr. They are so busy trying to push you threw their office but they are sure quick to collect the money , I went to the emergency room having real bad pain in my chest area I have been fighting breast canser already had surgery an seeing all kinds of doctors but I had to wait for hours to be seen then after giving me 2 or 3 reasons for the pain in my chest the doctor rubbing my leg telling me he thought he was having a heart attack an was rubbing his head , they loaded me up with strong pain medication sent me home ,found out it was hormone meds.that was causing all the pain, doctors don’t care to figure out your problem it is all about the money and how many patients to get threward their offices an line their pockets an when they won’t help you theyesterday send you to another doctor so they can charge you to. What are people going to do I have had doctors and fighting cancer was the worst I felt like with all they were putting me threw I spent most of my healing at home by my self ,but getting bills every day . I hope they wait on me paying them they have made a fortune off my insurance an still sending me 3000.00 worth of bills,

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    • This happened to me. I suffered for 8 years because of a cyst. Doctors thought I just wanted pain pills so they did no testing to see why I wanted to rip my own face off. 8 years later one finally listened and found a calcified cyst that damaged my facial bones. I had surgery and am better, but they could have fixed it earlier if they would have actually listened to me.

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    • You nailed it on the head! I had terrible adverse effects to medication but didn’t realize what it was. I had crushing chest pain, difficulty breathing, BP 170/100, dizziness, lost 20 pounds in 3 weeks. Not only did the first four doctors blow me off as an “anxious female,” they were really nasty about it and one of them was so unethical it left me in shock. I got so ill I could barely walk or stand and just made my will and waited to die. Luckily for me, I started vomiting and figured it out. After I recovered I hit the medical literature and although rare, these medications can cause unstable angina and stroke.

      Articles like this minimize the problem, adding insult to injury. I could care less if a doctor makes eye contact, don’t endanger my life because of your own prejudices. I would rather just die at home then get treated like garbage by people so biased they wouldn’t be allowed to work at TSA.

      Reply
  5. I feel for all the cases listed here and can understand where you are all coming from. I have worked in healthcare for decades and can see the demands placed on doctors everyday. It is not the same as it use to be. This last year I came down with the flu. I was home sick over two weeks and was under doctor’s care. About two weeks after recovering from the flu I became very weak, fatigued, and had difficulty walking. I went straight to the PCP where she had little to nothing to say about what was happening. Basically said she had seen a few others similar cases and to seek PT. When PT would not see me because I was still so sick and no diagnosis I returned to the PCP. PCP’s office would not assist me with getting a message to doctor and no explanation. Just the doctor would not be returning the call and no appointment available. I sought a second PCP. Initially, the second doctor seemed helpful and followed me for months. First initially seeing him weekly, than every few months. My weakness and fatigue continued and I was barely able to do house hold chores, grocery shop, or even work. Basically only taking my BP and vital signs no physical exam at all and no lab tests. Over a period of time I began to have issues with my bladder, UTI??? He treated me multiple times sight unseen nor any UA or cultures…just antibiotics. Since this is not my norm when I experienced symptoms again I called the office to speak to the PCP. He ordered antibiotics again and insisted I came to the office the next day. I questioned if he wanted an UA first and he said no start the antibiotics and he would do the UA the next day. In theory I knew this was backwards, but he insisted. I went to the office the next day. The office staff assisted me with the UA and then asked me to wait in an exam room. After a little while the doctor came flying into the room very escalated. This was surprising to me, since I had not seen him like this before. He was very agitated that I was in the office and began to speak to me aggressively regarding my symptoms of a UTI and the causative factors. He went down a check list 1.) menopause, 2.) hygiene, 3.) sexual activity…escalating the entire time as I am sitting in his office. Almost like Dr. Jekyll / Mr. Hyde. At one point I almost thought he had mistaken me for another patient when he went off on a very inappropriate discussion regarding sexual activity. I was new to his practice and we had never had any discussion previously regarding that or gynecology, etc. I actually became frozen and speechless as he banged his hands on the desk and told me he was “sick & tired” of speaking to me about my sexual activity…
    Since my illness I had also developed a tremor along with the weakness and fatigue. When the doctor became so escalated my tremor was very noticeable. He began asking questions and seemed to not recall my case. He did not have my chart, nor had he ever called me by name, nor had his staff properly ever called me by my name. So I continued to think he had the wrong patient. At a point he began yelling in the office and yelled that I have Parkinson’s Disease and walked out of the exam room and never came back. In fact no one ever came back in and I put my coat on and left. I subsequently visited my OB/gyne and neurologist who both felt I might have developed a neurogenic bladder due to the unexplained weakness/fatigue post viral episode. The neurologist was mortified that the PCP had been yelling an unfounded neurological diagnosis at me. My concerns were still he was speaking to the wrong patient, but then what kind of doctor speaks to any patient like this. My specialists felt I should confront him regarding this visit. So I returned for another office visit to only speak to him. I asked if we could talk about the last time I was in the office. He said yes you were here for a UA. I agreed, but then went into what happened after that. He first said he did not have those details charted, then gave excuses that I misunderstood him, his accent/poor english (neither were the case). At one point he almost was crying and gave a very sincere apology. And then understood why I might not want to return (trust had been broken) he was uncomfortable and felt he should no longer take care of me as a patient. And we mutually agreed. I shared that I would be taking a copy of my chart and he went to the office staff to get it prepared. So I returned a few days later to pick up my chart to find the final doctor’s entry stating that everything that I talked to him about never occurred and he denied our conversation. As I reviewed the EMR I continued to be shocked by the multiple inaccurate entries throughout. Each visit he documented physical examination he did not perform. I had been too weak to step up onto the exam table, so it would have been impossible for him to complete such examination. It sickens me that such doctors exist and such disrespect to the oath that each doctor takes to “first do no harm”. This means physical and emotional harm. One the trust is broken between patient and doctor there is no repairing it.

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  6. LOL. I read the bullet points at the top of the page explaining why the public has lost trust in doctors (and for the medical industry as a whole) and I have to say that its because doctors have actually sold us out BIG TIME! No need to ramble on about the needless suffering that people endure as a result of these doctors prescribing all these damn debilitating medications in the name of their own self-interests. Pill pushers are what most of you are and I sincerely hope that your days are numbered! That goes for the entire medical industry, including the FDA and big pharma.

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  7. The reason I have lost trust in most medical professionals isn’t on this list. In my experience when I really need them they have been proven to me by example to try 2 (3 tops) different avenues for non obvious issues. If the medicines don’t work the doctor gives up and then the bills start rolling in while I’m at home looking for a better doctor (only to be followed by more bills). My recent experience was a year old doctors, a ground out tooth, a biopsy, any money to spare paid in doctor bills being informed I had a syndrome with no visible symptoms, no way to test that I’d have to live with indefinitely but they’d give me anti depressants to deal with it and after a year I found out I was allergic to a detergent I used on my dish rag. I had a major back rash with boils at one time (bad allergy to a detergent) that was treated as acne and the doctor scoffed when I said my only relief was white distilled vinegar. (Not the expensive meds being promoted by big pharma) A three year case of candida handled by an NP after being prescribed 6 rounds of antibiotics for something I didn’t have and a a false diagnosis by a doctor having an incurable std that I didn’t even have. There is simply a cut off point that if it’s not life or death or getting a cavity filled I may as well figure it out myself.

    Reply
    • I feel the same. I don’t go to the doctor. I see no point. Waste hours of time to be ignored. Ten plus years of worsening symptoms and nobody will listen. If a blood test is 0.007 within normal limits but you have had symptoms for years it doesn’t matter. They’re all quacks.

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  8. I disagree on the reasons why the public is losing trust in doctors.

    We live in an information age. Very often patients are more informed than the doctors they go to see. This is especially true of rare and extremely poorly understood health issues such as ME/CFS. Too often the attitude of doctors is to brush off the opinions of the patient just because they researched the information online. Many doctors are perhaps afraid that their authority on the subject has been challenged.

    I’d hate to be the one to break the news, but the world has changed and it will continue to change as patients become more empowered by technology and new ways of thinking.

    If doctors want to keep up with the times, then it’s important to realise the importance of listening to the patient and seeing the doctor patient relationship as one of 2 equals.

    Reply
    • The medical ” profeession” is nothing but a money making scam.
      nhs consultant wannabees “registrars”.
      wrong/late diagnosis.
      just get them on the mind numbing drugs attitude, that make big pharma £100s of BILLIONS a year.
      I could write a tombe detailing the litany of wrong diagnosis,
      late treatment.
      NO explanations about my cancer.
      so called treatments which DO NOT work.
      and the wonderful ability to bury their mistaked when it all goes wrong.

      I COULD GO ON (but no one is listening.)

      i DARE you to try to get some REAL answers.

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      • AMEN!!!

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      • Spot on! I don’t mind that they make money but their lack of care for fellow human beings is disturbing. They look at most patients as a cadaver more than a living breathing human. I go through pain if I need anything stronger than an aspirin and use supplements for everything else. What is really funny is that I trust chiropractors more than doctors and doctors say they are quacks. Me thinks medical doctors are quacks… Don’t trust them and we should not be forced by our government to do business with them through healthcare tax laws.

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      • you cannot even understand what most people in the medical industry in the uk are saying.
        most do not even understand the language

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    • Excellent point. We can spend as much time online as we want researching symptoms and treatments. A doctor does not have that luxury. I think in the past 10 years of checkups I have actually made eye contact with a doctor for a grand total of 20 minutes. With so much informagion available we only need doctors for a physical repair or a prescription.

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  9. I would like to start my comment with quotes from Dr. Atul Gawande (from his lecturer on Radio 4): “There are two primary reasons why doctors fail. Number one is ignorance: we have only a limited understanding of all of the relevant physical laws and conditions that apply to any given problem or circumstance. The second reason, however, they called “ineptitude”, meaning that the knowledge exists but an individual or a group of individuals fail to apply that knowledge correctly. Gorovitz and MacIntyre saw a third possible kind of failure. Besides ignorance, besides ineptitude, they said that there is necessary fallibility, some knowledge science can never deliver on”. Should anyone ask the GP for an Amino Acid test or CPK symptoms & tests, the GP has no idea what we are talking about. Fair enough, it is impossible to know 1000s of names and procedures but GPs really ought to start moving away from dispensing medications like if they were M&M’s. There is no prevention in the healthcare system. When was the last time that GP asked his patient about his/her life style? His/her nutrition habits? A GP once insisted in telling my mother to stop drinking alcohol as her AST, GGT and ALT levels were very high. My mother was not drinking any alcohol – it was a combination of medications that raised her liver levels and made her very ill. Why do keep saying to patients that blood results are fine when often these are very short to become an issue? A blood sugar level of 5.8mmol/L does not ring any alarm bells at the surgery (there is no an asterisk next to the test) but at 6.0mmol/L or above – the GP will swiftly prescribe Type 2 Diabetes treatments (no prevention). After the USA, the UK is the second country in the world with the highest trend in prescribing Statins. There is not one single independent study showing that Statins actually save lives [1994–2002 ALLHAT study]. The latest, 15/11/2016, report by US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF), has found that: “evidence is yet not sufficient to assess the benefits and harms of starting statins for primary prevention of cardio vascular disease events and mortality”. While proton pump inhibitors (like Lansoprazole) are often prescribed to those taking NSAID drugs (like Naproxen), there is no suggestion to take CoQ10 when Statins are prescribed! Some doctors are moving towards “functional medicine” as they follow old guidelines set by those like Hippocrates and Galen. Naturopathy, Chiropractic medicine and Acupuncture are just a few of the alternatives available to the public. They mostly look at prevention or cure without medicines. The healthcare system wants us to believe that is looking after us, when in fact, doctors have become vending machines for the Big Pharma. For example, they want us to believe that Chemotherapy save lives (I suppose it might bring hope – and a lot of pain) but they don’t tell us that over a 5 years period “success” is limited to just above 2.0%. The Govt. gives GPs guidelines and I know that this is not what they want – there is no way that in 10 minutes GPs are able to give a professional assessment. The majority of the public is also at fault as they all expect a quick fix (hope) as they are often more concerned with TV, Media and mobile phones that their actual health. I simply wish we could move towards a more intelligent and concerned society.

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  10. Seems like everything in this article attempts to justify bad behaviors that doctors exhibit. If you are aware of the problem then be part of the solution. Seeing a patient for 4 minutes and billing for an hour may help “keep your practice afloat” but it is a huge disservice to a patient. I know from experience that many doctors may listen to their patients but don’t bother accurately reporting what their patients tell them. If you’re issue doesn’t neatly fit into the doctors 4 minute diagnosis then it wont be entered.

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    • I agree with you James. When my ruptured disk in my back happened, I went to the GP to try to find out what the problem was. The Doctor told me to exercise more after they poked me where it hurt. No explanation was given. I went a few years and the pain has persisted with no explanation. I kept going in and all the doctor wanted me to do is “take some pain killers and exercise”. I was already taking more than the maximum dose recommended of Acetaminophen and ibuprofen everyday. Every visit was 10 minutes long and consisted of laying on a cold table and being poked where it hurt for 5 minutes until I was told again to take painkillers. It cost a whopping $425 each time I went in for “Rehabilitation Exercise”, “Training for Rehabilitation Exercises” and “Evaluation Fee” of being poked in the back with sharp finger nails and getting my blood pressure taken.
      Doctors do nothing but take a paycheck and leave you with problems.
      On the 6th Visit the doctor told me that maybe I was “imagining the pain” which I was highly shocked by.
      On the 7th visit to the GP I yelled at the doctor for not fixing the problem and blowing me off. They gave me a referral to an imaging center where I was scanned. I was told nothing for that visit.
      I went in a second time and was told to lift my legs for 5 minutes then was told to go home.
      The second visit I had a horse needle with steroids injected into my spine and they told me “I was not a candidate for surgery” and was charged $25.
      The third visit they gave me muscle relaxers and an ointment that was applied to my back and it made me throw up, have vertigo, and Chronic Drowsiness. When I stopped use the symptoms ceased and I tried it again a week later and had the same symptoms.
      The fourth time I was finally diagnosed with a Ruptured Disk and I was still told “I am not a candidate at this time”.
      Doctors these days are jokes.
      I still have a ruptured disk and it prevents me from standing for long periods of time and bending over. I continue to take over the “recommended” dose of painkillers to slightly numb the pain.

      Reply
      • As a hospital worker I can tell you the MD story above is mostly accurate. What the public does not realize is that there have been sweeping changes, even this year. For example, many hospitals have programs in place that effectively limit services. The programs are called “bundled payments”. The hospital gets one check per patient hospitalization. If that check is shared with an out-patient physical therapist for example, the hospital gets less money. So of course they stop sending patients to out-patient therapy. And on and on it goes. Many services and products are no longer offered to patients because of payment cut-backs to hospitals/physicians etc…. One day surgery is still lucrative and more doctors are moving toward surgeries which do not include hospitalization–they say hospitalization is not necessary for many surgeries–I say they probably want to keep the entire check. Anyway, if you want to understand what is happening in healthcare, “follow the money”.

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    • I relate to all testimonies and reasons why patients are losing trust and hope in doctors. Seems to be prevalent and dangerous- case in point was when the African with Ebola was released from emergency care with misdiagnosis.

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  11. My experience with doctors are as explained above with many other comments. They make you feel as though you have not the right over your own body and the bodies of your children. They know better then you even though they see you or your child once a year for a pathetic check up and they have a sudden insight to your whole background. People want a doctor to come along side not bully and take over. Who’s paying who here? Furthermore doctoring is just looking at symptoms, throwing meds at you billing the crud out of you and wah- lah your fixed. People are SICK of it!!! Hate to say it but things are changing.

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  12. You claim these profit driven non listening doctors are a rarity, I beg to differ, but they are the norm. I am permanently disabled from a plethora of bad doctors who claimed there could not possibly be anything wrong with me. Sadly, I suffered an internal spinal collapse and spinal cord injury. An internal collapse not caused from trauma is very rare because any decent doctor would listen to your history and complaints and run an appropriate test. Not the case with the dozen plus doctors I saw before this happened.

    I jut pulled a Trump today and told my latest Neurologist, “You’re Fired!” He sucked so badly! I saw him for terrible head pain and geting dizzy and passing out. Does this jerk or the last jerk actually run a test? No. He prescribed med after med that made me very ill. I went to his office today because once again they can’t be bothered to answer a phone. I demanded to see my chart and there was the universal red allergy sticker with the med I am allergic to clearly visible, yet this “doctor” just prescribed med with that compound I am not to take. I was livid. These doctors today are a pathetic excuse. The only oath they took was to make money at anyone’s expense. If a few people are maimed or die, oh well. Nobody cares.

    In a couple of years people will look back and wonder how humans survived at all. The ridiculous methods doctors use. For instance the reflex test. It proves nothing except you haven’t killed me off yet because I move when hit with a hammer. Doctors used to say smoking was good for you too. Maybe I just need a good blood letting. Let the quackery continue, but not with me.

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  13. I share the same sentiment that most of the other commenters have shared. I’ve had bad experiences with doctors, one after the other- the exception being my OBGYN who actually knows how to treat his patients like real people.

    Primary care doctor- a nurse at the front desk Yelled like a lunatic at me. I was having a bad day so her yelling drove me to tears. So much for treating me like a person. The Nurse Practitioner was a judgmental person who probably perceived me as gay or a prude for not being her idea of what a person in my age ground “should be.” On multiple occasions I found I had to lie to her to avoid the pitfalls of the profit driven system, along with avoiding judgmental. looks. Top that with the face I never saw the real doctor in that practice and I still hope that nurse got fired or laid off.

    On one occasion I went to a gastroenterologist for what was an ulcer and got put on the strong meds. After two months of taking the prescribed pills, I started getting bad side effects from it. The fact that he never said a WORD about the side effects is what makes me mad even now. Also, because I hung up on the phone with one of the nurses in his practice, for a follow up he had a rude attitude with me. Sorry, but I wanted to respect the fact that the nurse had nothing to do with my angriness at you and the poison you prescribe.

    Later on went onto taking the weaker form of the pills and those would stop working after months anyway. Before we moved, the gastroenterologist wanted to talk to me, but I refused and had that appointed cancelled. Never gonna fall for those lies that I have to be on antacids for the rest of my life for something that’s temporary if treated fast enough.

    I did research on what naturally helps the stomach recover and prevent the problem I had and I’d rather do that then visit a doctor now.

    Dermatologists pretty much ignore me and I’ve had rosacea on my face for years. They don’t care and all they want to do is milk money out of my pocket to give to their greedy pharmaceutical friends. I’ve turned to using old fashioned apple cider vinegar on the effected areas because screw big pharmacy and the whole system.

    This is why I’ll never trust mainstream doctors again. If you can’t treat your patients like real people, then I’ll actively avoid it as much as possible.

    PS. Find a way to cut down the skyrocketing cost of medicine. I’m tired of the idea that if you get seriously ill you have to file for bankruptcy or take out huge loans. The US System is a failed system that’s only good for the upper middle class and the upper class of society. Even though the ACA makes sure that hospitals treat you if you can’t pay, it hasn’t stopped huge bills from having to be paid by the patient post-treatment.

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  14. I lost trust in most doctors when they refused to believe my symptom reports and/or consider my suggested diagnoses, and marked me as a “troublesome” patient. Despite having nearly completed a PhD in clinical psychology, taking a number of graduate level medical courses, working as a research assistant in a university family medicine research department, being praised for my own diagnostic skills during my clinical psychology internships, relying on pubmed and peer-reviewed journals when I suggested a diagnosis to a doctor, and having been taught and practiced differential diagnosis for the 6 years I spent doing internships and practicums, whenever I’ve suggested a possible diagnosis I’ve generally had to fight with the physician to have it seriously considered. I do extensive research when suggesting a diagnosis–so much so that one of the few doctors who truly listened to my diagnostic argument (a well known and respected neurologist from the Cleveland Clinic) looked at me with surprise and remarked, “Why, you’re really diagnosing!.” “Yes,” I replied, “I was taught to diagnose in my graduate studies.”

    However, with the exception of him and one other family physician who recognized that I practice differential diagnosis intelligently and correctly, I’ve faced dismissive attitudes from many others. As a result, I have been misdiagnosed with Bronchitis when I’d contracted whooping cough (the doctor didn’t believe my suggestion that the distinctive symptoms were whooping cough until I came in with my husband, who backed up my description of the distinctive nature of the cough, finally convincing the doctor that I truly had whooping cough–and also pointing out a sexist element in doctors being dismissive of my self-diagnoses, as I am a woman). I have correctly diagnosed my dogs with the following ailments, all of them at first dismissed by the vet and later proven correct: cutaneous fungal overgrowth (initially misdiagnosed as a bacterial infection by a vet); cutaneous hemangiosarcoma (initially classified as a harmless mole, later removed and biopsied for a diagnosis of, yes, cutaneous hemangiosarcoma); and most seriously, hemolytic anemia, of which my dog eventually died. I have also correctly diagnosed myself with lichens planus (diagnosis confirmed by an ENT) and shingles (confirmed by a family physician) as well as recurrent respiratory biofilm infections, which I’ve suffered since childhood (the doctor asked for my copy of the peer reviewed article I brought in, as she’d never heard such a thing was possible, although the literature now supports such a diagnosis). I have a number of neurological symptoms that, while I have not been able to pin down a certain diagnosis–and neither have my doctors–I at least have pushed to have certain tests done to rule out some diagnoses (and the doctors agreed to the testing after some initial resistence as they knew I was correct in voicing the possibility of that diagnosis). Most recently, I have been pooh-poohed by a couple of doctors for suspecting that the severe intercostal muscle pain I experienced two years ago–so severe it sent me to the emergency room–for which they found no cause yet suggested a possible muscle tear from coughing–and which then disappeared within 3 days, thereby ruling out a muscle tear–was Coxcackie B caused Bornholm disease. Since then, repeated bouts of herpangina and recurrent milder but distinctive intercostal muscle pain (co-occurring) leads me to believe that the Coxsackie virus has persisted in my system. Apparently, however, only pediatricians are aware that in cases of compromised immunity (and I caught the Bornholm’s during my convalescence from whooping cough, immediately after a 6 month regiment of prednisone for my neurological symptoms, both leaving my immune system incredibly weak), Coxsackie virus can evade the weakened immune system and persist/recur over longer periods of time. I have read accounts from pediatricians who are aware of this possibility–yet the rheumatologist I went to in regard to the apparent recurrences of herpangina/bornholms said this was impossible–despite admitting she was no expert in Coxsackie virus. I paid her $90 to be dismissed as a flake. In addition, she ignored the test results I brought with me showing I had contracted Coxsackie B1 and B3 in the past year or two–misreading them, as the type of testing I was given only shows the level of positive results the testing revealed if an infection is fairly recent. Instead, she misinterpreted this particular test as indicating I had Coxsackie virus as a child–revealing I knew more about that type of viral test than she did, at least in regard to the Coxsackie virus. I have found that only doctors without ego problems are willing to listen to me, and I now avoid going to the doctor unless the diagnosis is a crystal clear one. I have been right far more frequently than my doctors have, and have had treatments delayed for both my dog and myself due to egos getting in the way of seriously considering my diagnostic suggestions. Apparently, they fail to see that diagnosis is a rational practice that can be learned even by a non-MD, as long as that person has adequate training and experience, as well as a grounding in diagnostic techniques–instead of a magic rite capable of being practiced only by those who’ve been initiated into the cult of medicine.

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    • Caught a typo in my post from the other day–I meant “regimen,” not “regiment.”

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  15. Physicians have changed dramatically since the 90’s. They complain about everything…..it’s the insurance companies fault, attorney’s fault, patients, hospitals, everybody but theirs….are there any other professionals that are qua ranted payment for services. NO. They are lazy and stay inside their little boxes. Hospitalist….I think ruined physicians….before they came into play doctors were better…..smarter…to me if your a doctor and you don’t do rounds at a hospital….why are you a doctor? They don’t seem to be as educated…and we all know of some doctors who didn’t do to med school in a reputable country…maybe bought their degree? I happen to be associated socially with many doctors the most egotistical group of professionals. My opinion….hospitalist killed the physiciansame. Think about it that’s when doctors went lost their art.

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  16. ” It has been opposed on us from on high” bad grammar word usage makes me lose trust 🙂 Seriously though I was sick from lead poisoning from stripping lead paint off my house during a heavy stressful renovation and I had some liver problems causing choleostatis I looked pale and was fatigued. My brother managed to convince a doctor I was suicidal while I thought I needed an MRI for headaches and a diagnosis for exhaustion, despite my repudiation of the idea the decision had already been made and I could not get out of a psych ward for 5 days. Absolute insanity, but if you complain or refust to take the drugs you will be forced to. I no longer have trust in the medical system or my brother but I had to pay for the experience myself and have had to try and salvage my reputation. Mostly a total loss. How did I get well? I went to alternative medicine. About 75% quackery but one place actually cured my liver problems and now I’m healthy again. I could have easily got stuck in the madness of the medical system not to mention financial debt. I understand why things are expensive but your patients are not ignorant and know that the medical system needs patients to keep it afloat financially and there is a HUGE profit motive. We need a single payer healthcare system like the rest of the 1st world.

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  17. I feel for all who have written about their experiences. I’m so sorry this was your relationship with the medical community. I was in pharmacy and patient care for over 25 years, and now am an integrated counselor with a Masters in holistic health. I look at your whole life and we come up with options and I do the research to make sure you can make an informed choice and ask strong questions. I work behind the scenes as your advocate while providing the emotional support that you may need.
    I work with your doctor and caregivers so that you have the time and space to make good choices for yourself and family. I do not say this to drive up business, but to offer you hope that there is change coming. I spend the time with you that others can’t to make sure you are heard while using “medical speak” to your health care providers so they can offer you targeted treatments. It’s a win-win. This can only happen if I earn your trust. To the author: WE have to EARN TRUST, it is NOT demanded. It is built over time…respect comes from caring what happens from our interactions and follow up. I choose to make myself available to my clients,even when it may be inconvenient because I never want them to feel the way some here do. My client list is somewhat limited because I only take the number I can offer quality to. I’m not financially wealthy, but my clients never wonder if they are just a number. I make my rates manageable because these are troubling times and many are stressed to their limit. I leave room for charity and compassion. To the patients and providers here: we can do this if we work together. Patients will be honest about what they are really doing if they know we are on their side, and caregivers can provide better options if they have acurate information to work with. I promise to do my part in this.

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    • I had the same doctor for 26 years. He was an old school doctor and would literally throw pharma reps out of his practice because they had their time once a week when he wasn’t seeing patients. I had this HEALER since I was 16.

      When I was 42 he told me he was going to retire and I found a new GP. Call me gullible if you will but having grown up on the Southside of Chicago and later working on the Westside I thought I was pretty streetwise. I had seen every con, swindle, setup that you could imagine. Nobody was ever going to get over on me.

      That was until I met the NEW BREED of doctor. IMO they are the worst people to walk the face of the Earth. They lie to your face, do unnecessary procedures so they can bill your insurance and prescribe new and improved drugs when old tried and true ones would have done just fine. When I was approaching 50 I went for my DL renewal. I barely passed the vision part so off I went to my “trusty” ophthalmologist. I was right at 20/40. Instead of recommending glasses he gave me the hard sell for Lasik. He promised I would be 20/15, still able to read and have no side affects. I would have put drops in for a week, that would be the only thing that would be a hassle. It would take 15 minutes for the actual procedure and I would see like I was in my 20’s. The moral is that this was all bull.

      It was the worst thing I have ever done in my life, I now know why my ophthalmologist is a multimillionaire, I have been maimed for life and the best part for me is I never signed the informed consent form. My EYE doctor was too busy thinking about how he was going to spend my $5000 to bother to even check. They handed me a bunch of forms, I read all this nasty stuff that could happen so I didn’t sign them and I figured I would have time to ask this man about all of the side effects that could and did happen. I actually should have walked out but I figured I would go over them with him. “Don’t worry about it, none of that stuff ever happens” w/o ever checking if I signed the forms. He had me in the chair with the laser and I was asking questions. “Don’t worry, I do this 10 times every week.” To condense this I should have worried, just about everything bad that could of happen did and my only saving grace was under law I never gave consent. While they were telling me I was fine, I was in serious pain and my vision was and still is much worse then it was plus my eyes are constantly dry, only then did they notice I never signed.

      They had maimed me for life and had THEY no recourse. My ophthalmologist tried to get me to sign the forms later and date them the day of the surgery but I went for a second opinion and then a third. With those records in hand I went to an attorney. I was able to sue, my eyes are wrecked, I’m a far way from 20/15 and a $200 pair of glasses would have sufficed. Who would have thought that a ophthalmologist would make a crack dealer look honest? My GP heard about the lawsuit and dumped me as a patient.

      I have since settled the lawsuit (a decent amount but not even close to the actual damage done – no amount of money can make up for wrecked eyes), I found a new GP who I actually went to school with and have learned the hard way that MOST doctors could care at all about you but LOVE money. They are driven by GREED. Face it your doctor didn’t go to medical school to help people, they went to eventually make a bunch of money.

      The NEW BREED of doctor, they don’t even take the Hippocratic Oath. They take some oath but if you are motivated by money does any oath you take matter? I didn’t need the media to portray them in a bad light, I wish I had seen that BEFORE I put my trust in what I thought was a decent human being. I was wrong and even the author of this article has horrible reviews on the internet. She may have great reviews from her peers but her patients ALL rate her practice ONE STAR. The NEW BREED of doctor, outdone by the NEW BREED of patient. The internet is a two way street, IOW those in glass houses shouldn’t try and write articles about trust when their own patients don’t even trust them.

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  18. I trust my naturopathic doctor and the one MD I have found in the past decades who is an integrative medicine family physician. They both listen.
    They both work with me. I have yet to find other MDs who don’t yell at me when I object to something, or act dismissive, or push medicines I have had adverse reactions to, or who don’t instantly argue with me when I explain about a side effect. I have now been branded as “antiscientific” because of my lack of trust in physicians who do not take individual effects of strong pharmaceuticals into account, and who ignore concerns I have about the effects of others. I have caught many MDs in outright lies about side effects or diagnoses they may have given me, and about potential problems with invasive diagnostic testing. This makes me dig in and trust less rather than reassure me about worries I have, because then I don’t have any way to figure out who in the medical profession is lying to get their way, or who has been brainwashed into believing that there are no such thing as problem side effects, as opposed to a healthy reassurance that I don’t need to worry about something.

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  19. For a doctor, there is an inherent tension between “having the right answer” and a reality that there may not be any clear answer. There is also a tension around providing the right amount of additional information to a patient. Some patients do not want any information, they just want the doctor to fix them. When a doctor misreads the patient and gives a pat answer without explanation to a patient wanting more, or too much information to someone that only becomes anxious with more information. Either case can cause a loss of trust.
    As one who always wants to know as much as possible about a doctor’s thinking and about possible alternatives, it is amazing to find those who just want the doctor to “fix them”.

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    • i really like your comment, it is thoughtful and accurate in my opinion, communication is an art form it really is, (and you seem to already to know this), because someone has a good memory and can pass written test with flying colors does not by any means , mean that they have good social skills even with patients whom do not, this is a really important aspect of a doctors life and he has been conveniently replaced with lengthy questionnaires for the patients and other scripted items to distance the patient from the doctor, i think you bring up a most valid point , thank you

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  20. I lost trust in my doctor when I found out she was talking to my domestic partner about my case.
    The trust between a doctor and their client is sacred and when we are told that all information is confidential it should remain so.
    I also learned that what she was doing is legal and is called gleaning, where she can listen to what anyone has to say, but she cant discuss specifics.
    But during my last 3 visits she had brought up issues I don’t have, based on what information she received from my domestic partner.
    She seemed upset that I wouldn’t talk about it, or what was current going on in my life. How can I if I don’t trust her.
    I really needed to talk to her because I just spent 2 months in a domestic violence shelter because of abuse at home.
    If gleaning is legal, What if it affects the relationship and treatment between a patient and their doctor. Is it still legal…. WHERE ARE THE BOUNDARIES ???
    At what point does gleaning violate HIPAA

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    • Oh wow. That is horrible. Can’t trust anyone anymore. It is none of her business to be taking information from someone who does not have any business in your medical information! Doctors are complete jokes!

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  21. Agreed that what moves today doctors in the USA is only profit, I wonder why Americans don’t unanimously stand and shout out loud that is finally time to have a universal health care system insted of the actual health care privatization which is precisely the reason why doctors are guided by profit first and, MAYBY, by compassion for humanity and passion for their profession. Hey, people, wake up!

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  22. Well, for one IMO; they are pressed for time, why? Because, most if not all double book their pt’s. Greed, they charge well above what most services cost. They make most of their income by performing unecessary surgeries. I could talk about that all night. They are in some ways lazy, not all, they want all the credit, for a job done, and most nurses and allied health associates do the work…..I sense that they have lost touch with compassionate patient care…it’s not being treated like an idiot!! Some are complete liars instead of admitting to their lack of competence…here comes the ego in the white coat!!

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  23. Here are some (maybe more pressing) reasons that people have no trust in their physicians. 1. They hardly look at us, let alone listen to or empathize with us. How can you diagnose someone who you’re not even hearing? We get interrupted, intimidated and ignored. 2. The profit motive. MANY doctors, not just outliers, receive money from Pharmaceutical and medical supply companies for promoting their goods. “The more money doctors receive from drug and medical device companies, the more brand-name drugs they tend to prescribe, a new ProPublica analysis shows. Even a meal can make a difference.” Want us to trust you again? Stop taking money from these industries.

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  24. My problem is that I will make an appt and get to the office and only see a nurse practitioner and not the same one ever. The Drs name is on door and goes over files n signs off on them. These people don’t know me. For instance I went to a dermatologist for a rash around my nose. I never laid eyes on Dr. after 6 mo of going in and them not diagnosing the problem right and wouldn’t refill the script unless I come in. I got wore down n gave up for a yr. I was plagued by this rash n finally made another appt with a Dr that did see me. He said I was misdiagnosed and gave me a script that cleared it just in a few days n hasn’t returned… I’m chronically ill and that’s just one example. I HAVE NO DR THAT SEES ME AS A WHOLE PERSON. IM PARTS TO EVERY DR.
    this to me is a big problem and leads to misdiagnosis. It took 20 yrs to find a Dr that finally found out that I have Autoimmune Hepititis… MY IMMUNE SYSTEM SEES MY LIVER AS A INTRUDER N ATTACKED MY LIVER…This misdiagnosis made me now need a New liver. If would have caught sooner I would not have needed that liver… TELL ME WHY??? Its because most Drs don’t care. Also, u may find a good Dr while in a hospital but he is a HOSPITALIST… They have no office n u never lay eye on them again…. What Is wrong with this picture….

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  25. Well the comments are interesting and this article is true beyond words. Doctors (Along with many other things in society) have utlimately become “Lawyer driven”. The fear that these people have created has made everyone useless at their jobs. We are seeing the fall of the Roman Empire imploding in a wave of Liberal atrociousness that makes everyone right and no one wrong. At the end of the day, the root of the problem are just as much the people’s fault as it is the doctors. Greed is the ultimate root this problem from both fronts. Lawyers would not have power if people weren’t using them for their own personal benefit. At the end of the day, you have to educate yourself and look past the egos of ALL professional people. That is what I look for in all aspects of people in business. As soon as you know it all in life, how teachable will you ever be regardless of your intelligence?

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  26. The United States is an oligarchy.

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  27. I was super sick I was just waiting to die I lost total faith in doctors I had seen over 60 doctors 100’s of test’s and over 200 visits to clinic or hospital . For dizziness, nausea , dry heaves, weight loss, rash, heart palpitations, blurred vision, tremors, brain pressure and brain fog, and extreme fatigue, I was offered anti-depressants a few times, which is silly . I was not depressed I was desperate because I was dying! It took over two years before I was diagnosed by a doctor that is an MD, and a Chinese medicine doctor and a naturopathic doctor that was in private practice and he ran his own show. had you meet with a nutritionists before you walked out the door. Patients were on waiting list a mile long to see him He diagnosed me by the second visit with mycotoxins poisoning , which is black mold poisoning I did not even know this was hidden in our newer house, He was curing people left and right, This is doctor is worked on cases that the medical university could not figure out and he would figure it out This doctor maybe is one in thousand maybe one in ten thousand . I have a family member that is doctor in a prestigious facility and I can say this the stress level and the patient load is insane, and many of the doctors there are not thrilled, because they are overworked
    how can you do your job when more patients means more money for the people at the top and the doctors are buried in red tape. I would rather go to see a naturopathic doctor any day, I have noticed this they always are slim, look super healthy looking, and take the time to listen to you and talk with you, are compassionate and caring, you never ever feel rushed. Of course it is some serious trauma I would go to the ER I had a droopy eye I was given an x-ray and an MRI they suspected a stroke, nothing was found, I went to Chinese Medicine Doctor he cured me within 48 hours! It is these sorts of events that make you step back and think, and reevaluate some false belief you held that no longer fits the paradigm

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  28. If you care to know why at least one member of the public lost all faith in the medical proffession a decade and a half ago, I can tell you.

    First, it’s being caught in “Doctor-Psychologist Ping Pong”, as I call it.
    Doctor: “Oh, I don’t think this is a real medical problem. You need to see a counselor.”
    Counselor: “You really dont show any signs of serious emotional trauma, other than having chronic pain. I really think you should see a doctor and have tests run.”
    Doctor: “The tests are pretty normal. I think you’re just somotizing, and you should see a different counselor.”
    Different Counselor: “I really don’t see any signs of somotization disorder. Perhaps you should try a different doctor?”
    Different Doctor (Immediately after I was rushed there by ambulance, filled with 2 doses of Demorol and four doses of Morphine to keep me from screaming in agony): “I don’t believe you have a real medical condition. I refuse to run any tests. I think it’s all in your head.”
    Counselor at a Mental Facility I checked myself into to try to get help (after they said, and I quote, “I think we can help you.”): “Until you tell us what your emotional problem is, we won’t feed you.”
    That’s a real-life look at “Doctor-Psychologist Ping Pong” and what it feels like to be the ball everyone wants to pay for they rendering NO useful service whatsoever. Every time you get pinged or ponged across the table, your trust for your doctor ebbs away bit-by-bit until there is nothing left but nightmares of long hospital stays and terrible verbal abuse from both sides of the table. Welcome to the world of the patient.

    Second, it’s the total blasé Doctors use as they do things that have permanent consequences without any concern for the harm they are causing. I am covered with INCREDIBLY painful damage (whether nerve damage or tissue damage or something else entirely, no one knows) caused by injections and incisions. (How do I know the cause? Because it’s obvious. The sore-spot caused by the injection or incision will be like an invisible bruise that slowly gets worse until 6-12 months later it develops into full-on damage that can trigger a seizure reaction). They never heal. The pain never lessens, though muscle control eventually does. I live with it every day, but the ones who caused it go on with their day. They can wear a coat and cuddle under a blanket when they’re cold at night. Why should they care that I no longer can… because of THEM?

    Third: Misdiagnosis. It’s a single word that describes so much of what’s wrong with medicine today. Over and over and over and over (and on and on) I was given one patently ridiculous disgnosis after another. Here’s a few choice highlights:
    – “Every time you think you’re in pain, put a cold orange on your belly button to make it go away.” (Yeah, that didn’t help and, frankly, was very uncomfortable, like being punished for being honest, especially to a 5-year-old.)
    – Doctor: “Well, we’ve determined that you have OCD.”
    Me: “Why would you say that?”
    Doctor: “Because you answered this one question that you ‘Can’t control it’.”
    Me: “Yeah, I can’t control the pain. I have methods of dealing with it, but I can’t make it go away.”
    Doctor: “Stop making excuses. I’ve given you my diagnosis and, even if you don’t want to hear it, this medicine and some counseling is all you need.”
    – (After describing the chest pains and chest heaviness that makes it hard to breathe and makes my arms and legs feel like lead weights and makes me feel peaceful and very cold and very, very sleepy) “Oh, you don’t want it to be a heart problem.” (Well, since we’re talking about what *I* want, I want you to wave a magic wand and make me all better again. I guess we can’t all have what we want. Needless to say, I chose not to answer the Doctor this way because it never does any good. They don’t want to help you in the first place, and that only gets worse if you use logic to show how ridiculous they are being.)

    Fourth: Pressuring people to do things that are bad for them because of “policies”. When some rule or policy is more important to you than doing what is actually right for your patient long-term, the first casualty is the doctor-patient relationship, whether it’s me being denied antacids and motility drugs because I refuse to wear long pants when it’s only 55 or 60 outside (because I know it’d make me VERY sick to do so) or my aunt being refused essential nerve medications because she refused to have sex with the doctor. These abuses of power are rampant and used to pressure unwilling patients into everything from mere office visits (no matter how far away or inconvenient) to tests, proceedures, and surgeries they do not want.

    Yeah, there’s a VERY good reason patients like me don’t trust doctors. Painful experience after painful experience has been our tutor. When we really started going to Doctors in earnest when I was 17, I believed that most doctors were like Beverly Crusher on Star Trek: TNG, kind and caring and committed to finding answers and sleuthing out clues to whatever ails you. What I found by bitter expereince after bitter experience, involving multiple hospitals (more than one being specificly diagnostic hospitals) and dozens of doctors across 7 US States, was that, in the real world, Doctors make the rude and insensitive EMH from Star Trek: Voyager look like a saint. As I so-often point out to people, “Lack of respect for authority always stems from the abuse of authority.” If the general public is losing their respect for doctors’ authority, maybe there is a VERY good reason for it. All the press in the world (for better or worse) can’t compete with personal experience (for better or worse).

    I accept that the there are a lot of pressures imposed on Doctors from outside forces, meaning that they may simply be the dealers of a product rendered inferior by others they can’t control, but, at the end of the day, that’s exactly WHY the trust was lost in the first place (the inferior product that we are still forced to pay a premium price for, even when it does nothing to help and often does worlds of harm). Policies need to change, and only Doctors have a chance at doing it. Behavior toward patients needs to change, and only Doctors have the power to do it. When those things change and the product improves in quality and efficacy, I think patients would trust doctors again. Those of us who’ve lost faith in medicine WANT help. We’re just tired of paying over and over and over again for “Snake Oil” that turns out to be turpentine.

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    • I really feel for you! I too have no trust for doctors due to some bad experiences involving members of my family and myself. Some doctors really do have the hubris to believe that just because they can’t find it, it (the problem in the physiology of the body) does not exist. What I believe is that they just don’t know where and how to look, or that there may not be a precise definitive test available yet. I got so greatly fed up that I began to educate myself about the anatomy and physiology of the human body, and this is a continuing process. I think we all must do this in order to protect our health from bad decisions and bad pharmaceuticals. One of my family members has permanent gastrointestinal damage from a long course of a high dose NSAID, another has an allergy to an antibiotic due to improper diagnosis and being prescribed the antibiotic for too long of a time for ineffectual treatment of a virus. I too live in pain 24/7 which began 12 years ago and I completely understand the horrid game of doctor/psychiatrist ping pong. I have encountered some truly good doctors and these doctors are the ones I hold as the standard when comparing the care received at the hands of the bad ones. Unfortunately, the good doctors are not available anymore! Fortunately, some of the bad ones aren’t either! I do keep hoping that I will find another. In the meantime, I refuse to do anything that I believe is harmful based on my own educated information. If I think a test or procedure to be extraneous and non productive, I say so and exactly why I believe this. If I know a drug to be harmful and unscientifically proven or not approved for the use suggested, I say so and refuse it.

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