February 2018 Briefing – Radiology

February 2018 Briefing – Radiology
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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Radiology for February 2018. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Patients’ Breast Radiotherapy Experiences Beat Expectations

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 28, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Most patients report having little to no knowledge about breast radiotherapy (RT), and patients’ experiences are generally better than their expectations, according to a study published online Feb. 26 in Cancer.

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Early Studies Often Show Exaggerated Treatment Effect

TUESDAY, Feb. 27, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Trials to evaluate drugs or devices used to treat chronic medical conditions that are published early in the chain of evidence often show an exaggerated treatment effect compared with subsequent trials, according to research published online Feb. 21 in the Mayo Clinical Proceedings.

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Race, Insurance Status Affects Job Status After Breast Cancer

TUESDAY, Feb. 27, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Diminished employment two years after early-stage breast cancer diagnosis is associated with African-American race and uninsured or publicly insured status, according to a study published online Feb. 13 in Cancer.

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Women With Non-Obstructive CAD May Suffer From Myocardial Scars

TUESDAY, Feb. 27, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Among women with suspected ischemia and no obstructive coronary artery disease (INOCA), the prevalence of baseline late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) indicating presence of myocardial scars is 8 percent, according to a research letter published in the Feb. 20 issue of Circulation, a Go Red For Women issue focused on women’s heart health.

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Recommendations for Optimizing Hidden Curriculum in Medicine

MONDAY, Feb. 26, 2018 (HealthDay News) — In a position paper published online Feb. 27 in the Annals of Internal Medicine, the American College of Physicians (ACP) presents recommendations for optimizing clinical learning environments by fostering a positive hidden curriculum in medicine.

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MRI Risk Model May Cut Biopsy Use in Suspected Prostate Cancer

MONDAY, Feb. 26, 2018 (HealthDay News) — A risk model including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-derived parameters may reduce the number of unnecessary biopsies among patients with suspected prostate cancer, according to a study published online Feb. 22 in JAMA Oncology.

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Coronary Artery Dz Extent Similar in Men, Women With T1DM

MONDAY, Feb. 26, 2018 (HealthDay News) — For patients with type 1 diabetes, the extent of coronary artery disease (CAD) is similar in women and men admitted for coronary angiography, according to a study published online Feb. 20 in Diabetes Care.

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Artificial Intelligence May Help Prevent Physician Burnout

FRIDAY, Feb. 23, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Artificial intelligence (AI), in which computers can be trained to recognize patterns in large quantities of data, may be able to reduce physicians’ burdens, saving them time and energy, according to a report published in Medical Economics.

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Kurtosis Diffusion-Weighted Imaging Helps ID Breast Lesions

THURSDAY, Feb. 22, 2018 (HealthDay News) — A radiomics model based on kurtosis diffusion-weighted imaging reduces false positives in women with suspicious findings on mammography, according to a study published online Feb. 20 in Radiology.

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CDC: No Change in Percentage of Uninsured in U.S. From ’16 to ’17

THURSDAY, Feb. 22, 2018 (HealthDay News) — The percentage of uninsured U.S. persons of all ages did not change significantly from 2016 to the first nine months of 2017, according to a report published online Feb. 22 by the National Center for Health Statistics.

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Burnout Found Prevalent Among Doctors in Single Health System

TUESDAY, Feb. 20, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Burnout is prevalent among physicians, affecting over one-third of physicians in a single health system, and is associated with health care delivery, according to a research letter published online Feb. 19 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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AAP, POSNA Release 5 Pediatric Orthopedic Recommendations

THURSDAY, Feb. 15, 2018 (HealthDay News) — As part of the Choosing Wisely campaign, the American Academy of Pediatrics and Pediatric Orthopaedic Society of North America have released a list of five orthopedic tests and procedures that are commonly ordered but are not always necessary for treatment of children with certain musculoskeletal conditions.

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Ultra-Processed Food Linked to Increased Overall Cancer Risk

THURSDAY, Feb. 15, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Consumption of ultra-processed food is associated with increased risk of overall and breast cancer, according to a study published online Feb. 14 in The BMJ.

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FDA Approves First Blood Test to Evaluate Potential Concussions

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 14, 2018 (HealthDay News) — The first blood test designed to help health care professionals evaluate mild traumatic brain injury has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

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Mean Depth of Ultrasonographic Penetration Greater in Autism

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 14, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have a significantly greater mean depth of ultrasonographic penetration, according to a study published online Feb. 12 in JAMA Pediatrics.

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Higher Biopsy Rates for Women Undergoing Screening Breast MRI

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 14, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Women undergoing screening breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have higher biopsy rates and significantly lower cancer yield findings compared with screening mammography alone, regardless of personal history of breast cancer (PHBC), according to a study published online Feb. 12 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Safety of PERC Tool Validated for Very Low Risk PE Rule Out in ER

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 14, 2018 (HealthDay News) — For low risk patients with suspected pulmonary embolism (PE), randomization to eight-item PE rule-out criteria (PERC) seems safe, according to a study published in the Feb. 13 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Four Best Practices Outlined to Prevent Health Care Cyberattacks

TUESDAY, Feb. 13, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Four best practices outlined that can help prevent health care cyberattacks, which increased from 2016 to 2017, according to a report published in Managed Healthcare Executive.

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Education About Imaging Most Often Given by Ordering Provider

TUESDAY, Feb. 13, 2018 (HealthDay News) — For patients undergoing imaging examinations, 78 percent reported receiving some form of pre-examination information, while 52 percent sought information themselves, according to a study published online Feb. 13 in Radiology.

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EHRs Not Sufficient to Ensure Success in Value-Based Care

MONDAY, Feb. 12, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Electronic health records (EHRs) are not sufficient to ensure success in value-based care, according to an article published in Medical Economics.

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Ultrasound for Rectal Cancer Staging Tied to More Chemoradiation

MONDAY, Feb. 12, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Use of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) for rectal cancer (RC) staging is associated with higher use of neoadjuvant chemoradiation but no significant improvement in overall survival, according to a study published online Jan. 26 in the Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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Quality Improvement Efforts May Improve Cath Lab Efficiencies

MONDAY, Feb. 12, 2018 (HealthDay News) — A quality improvement intervention can reduce inefficiencies in the cardiac catheterization laboratory (cath lab), according to a study published online Jan. 31 in JACC: Cardiovascular Interventions.

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Top Consumer Concerns Reported About Physicians

FRIDAY, Feb. 9, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Health care consumers have four major concerns regarding their physicians, according to a report published by Managed Healthcare Executive.

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Poll: Personal Beliefs Shouldn’t Allow Doctors to Refuse to Treat

THURSDAY, Feb. 8, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Most people do not believe that professionals including health care providers should be allowed to refuse to provide services based on their conscience or beliefs, according to a recent HealthDay/The Harris Poll.

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FDA Says U.S. Will Now Produce Critical MRI Component

THURSDAY, Feb. 8, 2018 (HealthDay News) — A long-feared shortage of a substance used in millions of medical imaging procedures each year in the United States appears to have been avoided, federal officials report.

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Active Surveillance OK for Non-Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer

THURSDAY, Feb. 8, 2018 (HealthDay News) — For patients with non-muscle invasive bladder cancer, active surveillance seems reasonable and cost-effective, according to a study published in the February issue of The Journal of Urology.

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Marked Variation Seen in Care Quality for TIA, Minor Stroke

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 7, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Care quality for patients with transient ischemic attack (TIA) or minor stroke varies substantially across elements of care and facilities, according to a study published online Feb. 5 in JAMA Neurology.

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High Detection Rates of High-Grade DCIS Persist

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 7, 2018 (HealthDay News) — High detection rates of high-grade ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) persist in consecutive subsequent screening rounds versus the prevalence round, while there are decreases in detection rates of low- and intermediate-grade DCIS, according to a study published in the February issue of Radiology.

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Ketamine + Propofol Speeds Recovery for Peds MRI Sedation

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 7, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Use of ketamine at induction followed by reduced propofol infusion rate for maintenance is associated with shorter recovery times for children undergoing magnetic resonance imaging with deep sedation, according to a study published online Jan. 27 in Pediatric Anesthesia.

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Head, Neck Imaging Uncommon in Patients With Palate Trauma

TUESDAY, Feb. 6, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Patients presenting to the emergency department with a primary diagnosis of palate trauma often do not undergo head and neck imaging, according to a study published online Feb. 1 in JAMA Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery.

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Distance From Advanced Cardiac Care Affects Odds of Survival

MONDAY, Feb. 5, 2018 (HealthDay News) — In patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS) complicated by cardiogenic shock (CS) in Nova Scotia, Canada, access to cardiac catheterization independently predicts survival, but those farthest from the center offering cardiac catheterization are the least likely to be transferred, according to a study published recently in the Canadian Journal of Cardiology.

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Humanities Exposure Positively Impacts Medical Students

MONDAY, Feb. 5, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Exposure to the humanities correlates with less burnout and higher levels of positive personal qualities among medical students, according to a study published online Jan. 29 in the Journal of General Internal Medicine.

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Factors Identified That Impact Physicians IT Adoption

FRIDAY, Feb. 2, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Physicians have considerable concerns about the efficacy and evidence base of health information technology (IT), according to a report published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

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TTFields Tied to Improved Survival in Glioblastoma Patients

FRIDAY, Feb. 2, 2018 (HealthDay News) — For patients with glioblastoma, the addition of tumor-treating fields (TTFields) to standard treatment with temozolomide is associated with improved survival without negative effects on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) other than itchy skin, according to a study published online Feb. 1 in JAMA Oncology.

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Estimated Biopsy Rate Varies After Breast Cancer Treatment

FRIDAY, Feb. 2, 2018 (HealthDay News) — The estimated biopsy rate after breast cancer treatment varies, according to a study published online Jan. 31 in JAMA Surgery.

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Medicaid Expansion Cuts Out-of-Pocket Spending

THURSDAY, Feb. 1, 2018 (HealthDay News) — States that expanded Medicaid cut the probability of non-elderly near-poor adults being uninsured and lowered average out-of-pocket spending, according to a study published online Jan. 24 in Health Affairs.

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