THURSDAY, Nov. 8, 2018 (HealthDay News) — For premenopausal women with stage I to IIIA estrogen receptor-negative, progesterone receptor-negative breast cancer, goserelin plus chemotherapy is associated with an increased likelihood of becoming pregnant without an increased risk for adverse effects, according to a study published online Oct. 29 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

Halle C.F. Moore, M.D., from the Cleveland Clinic Foundation, and colleagues examined long-term pregnancy and disease-related outcomes for patients in S0230/POEMS, which enrolled premenopausal women with stage I to IIIA estrogen receptor-negative, progesterone receptor-negative breast cancer. Participants were randomly assigned to standard chemotherapy with or without goserelin. A total of 105 patients in the chemotherapy + goserelin arm and 113 in the chemotherapy arm were evaluable.

The researchers found that at least one pregnancy was reported by more patients in the chemotherapy + goserelin arm versus the chemotherapy arm (five-year cumulative incidence, 23.1 versus 12.2 percent, respectively; odds ratio, 2.34; 95 percent confidence interval, 1.07 to 5.11; P = 0.03). There were non-statistically significant improvements in disease-free and overall survival with randomization to goserelin + chemotherapy (hazard ratios, 0.55 [95 percent confidence interval, 0.27 to 1.1; P = 0.09] and 0.45 [95 percent confidence interval, 0.19 to 1.04; P = 0.06], respectively).

“Our final results show a means to improve quality of life for young women with hormone-receptor negative breast cancer,” Moore said in a statement. “If they want to be mothers, they can improve their chances safely and effectively.”

Several authors disclosed financial ties to pharmaceutical companies, including AstraZeneca, which partially funded the study and provided the study drug.

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