The #PWChat series continued with another engaging conversation on an important topic: minorities in medicine. Jasmine Marcelin, MD, co-hosted the discussion. She is the Assistant Professor of Infectious Diseases and the Associate Medical Director of the Antimicrobial Stewardship Program at the University of Nebraska Medical Center.

Topics discussed included: results from a survey on patient bias toward doctors and nurses and participants’ experiences directly with, or witnessing, race-based microagressions from patients, colleagues, or support staff and how they handled these situations; what can be done to close the gap across racial/ethnic lines, including resources or support to help negotiate fair pay; what steps are or can be taken within individual organizations to address implicit bias and increase minority representation, and much more!

Below are the highlights from the chat. You can read the full transcript here, by scrolling down to the corresponding responses.

Click here for a look at our #PWChat schedule and recaps.

 

 

 

Question 1

Q1: Have you experienced or witnessed race-based microagressions from patients, colleagues or support staff? How did you handle these situations? #PWChat #MinoritiesInMedicine

Read “Credentials Don’t Shield Doctors, Nurses from Bias” for more on this:https://t.co/vFTyj5I27a pic..com/ADaPa0jTSc

— Physician’s Weekly (@physicianswkly) June 20, 2018

A1 #PWChat A personal example: a colleague once shared that he believed that he, as a Caucasian male was at a disadvantage when it came to job opportunities, because a selection committee would ALWAYS choose #MinoritiesInMedicine over him.

— Jasmine R Marcelin, MD (@DrJRMarcelin) June 20, 2018

A1: I have a diverse patient population & have noticed a couple of themes:
1) If a Caucasian pt treats staff poorly, they are accommodated & apologized to. If it’s a non-Caucasian pt, I am told that I need to “talk to your pt” – multiple instances#MinoritiesinMedicine #PWChat

— Nusheen Ameenuddin 🧕🏽👩🏽⚕️ (@namd4kids) June 20, 2018

Subtly.Unconsciously.Unintentionally. Prejudiced Attitude. These words speak to me in the definition of microaggression because I’ve experienced people who believe
they are not racist engage in this behavior, completely unaware of the
consequences. #MinoritiesInMedicine #PWChat pic..com/pLA6HlZqYk

— Jasmine R Marcelin, MD (@DrJRMarcelin) June 20, 2018

I have several colleagues who have been asked to show their student IDs by security while studying on campus…all are people of color. This is not a common occurrence, nor do we typically have issues with strangers on our campus. #PWChat

— Rohan Khazanchi (@rohankhaz) June 20, 2018

A1 #PWChat: Yes,from patients, staff & colleagues throughout training & while on faculty. I did not ignore it. I 1st checked my emotions & then responded directly, professionally, & with purpose so that they knew I was there for a purpose & that their comments were not welcomed.

— Darrell Gray, MD,MPH (@DMGrayMD) June 20, 2018

 

 

Question 2

Q2: The minority pay gap in medicine is real (https://t.co/hHeD9BRKQo, https://t.co/5FqqbaYQlJ). What do you think can be done to close the pay gap across racial/ethnic lines? Do you have resources or support to help negotiate fair pay? #PWChat #MinoritiesInMedicine pic..com/dbzZt7QdwZ

— Physician’s Weekly (@physicianswkly) June 20, 2018

#PWChat there is not a pay gap between white male physicians and black female physicians, there is a CHASM, with a reported median difference of $100,258 – even AFTER adjusting for specialty, hours, geography etc. #MinoritiesInMedicine pic..com/AULPpUvo6f

— Jasmine R Marcelin, MD (@DrJRMarcelin) June 20, 2018

A2 #PWChat: it is important to identify champions in your division, department, organization, or field (if even outside of your organization) who can aid in the process. #MinoritiesInMedicine

— Darrell Gray, MD,MPH (@DMGrayMD) June 20, 2018

Agreed. Twitter has been great for me to see what people are doing elsewhere. @DrQuinnCapers4‘s feed and @KirwanInstitute websites are great resources to figure out where to start

— Jasmine R Marcelin, MD (@DrJRMarcelin) June 20, 2018

A2: For the minority pay gap in medicine
1) Transparency in pay in institutions and how that is determined
2) More minority in leadership positions-often left out of the C-suite positions that provide higher pay
3) An audit of salaries at institution#PWChat #MinoritiesInMedicine

— Nusheen Ameenuddin 🧕🏽👩🏽⚕️ (@namd4kids) June 20, 2018

 

 

Question 3

Q3: Implicit racial bias can affect diversity of medical school admissions. (https://t.co/Qst2KwOmWe) What steps have you noticed being taken in your organization to address implicit bias and increase minority representation? #PWChat #MinoritiesInMedicine pic..com/iusnbNp0K2

— Physician’s Weekly (@physicianswkly) June 20, 2018

A3. #PWChat @u_nebraska has an inclusive excellence development series that I recently learned about (missed it last year) https://t.co/RG40aR4PPU. They have someone come in from @KirwanInstitute to talk about implicit bias and how to mitigate its effects #MinoritiesInMedicine

— Jasmine R Marcelin, MD (@DrJRMarcelin) June 20, 2018

A3 #PWChat I love the idea of reaching out to undergrads to increase #MinoritiesInMedicine. The pipeline needs to go back even further though – let’s get the kids excited about medicine in Elementary, Middle & High School, and show them they can succeed!

— Jasmine R Marcelin, MD (@DrJRMarcelin) June 20, 2018

A3 #PWChat: At my organization (@OhioStateMed), we’re blessed to have @DrQuinnCapers4 and others lead the charge in assessing & addressing #implicitbias in med school admissions and patient care. Identifying the problem is one step, but eliminating the problem is a culture shift.

— Darrell Gray, MD,MPH (@DMGrayMD) June 20, 2018

 

 

Question 4

Q4: Do you see minorities represented in academic, hospital or society leadership? Are they able to affect change? Is there upward sponsorship of other minorities?
Read White Coats 4 Black Lives 2018 report for more: https://t.co/ghe2mqpf72 #PWChat #MinoritiesInMedicine pic..com/Clyc3nRZIR

— Physician’s Weekly (@physicianswkly) June 20, 2018

A4 #PWChat @unmc our Senior Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs @deled_dele represents #MinoritiesInMedicine in a significant leadership role. A smattering of women in some leadership roles, but would especially LOVE to see more #BlackWomenInMedicine in leadership roles

— Jasmine R Marcelin, MD (@DrJRMarcelin) June 20, 2018

A4 #PWChat @unmc our Senior Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs @deled_dele represents #MinoritiesInMedicine in a significant leadership role. A smattering of women in some leadership roles, but would especially LOVE to see more #BlackWomenInMedicine in leadership roles

— Jasmine R Marcelin, MD (@DrJRMarcelin) June 20, 2018

A4: This varies a lot and is a really important issue. I think everyone needs more education and training about how to best mentor and sponsor those who are underrepresented. #PWChat #MinoritiesInMedicine

— Julie Silver, MD (@JulieSilverMD) June 20, 2018

I feel sponsorship is lacking. Sponsors are opening those hidden doors you didn’t know existed. Showing up and doing a good job is not enough without a sponsor to show you the way. And sponsors don’t have to be same race, gender, etc. #PWChat #MinoritiesInMedicine

— Brian H. Williams, MD (@BHWilliamsMD) June 20, 2018