Dr. Linda Girgis, MD, FAAFP joined Physician’s Weekly to co-host Part II in our #PWChat series, on Wednesday, Oct. 25, on how to steer patients toward reliable resources when it comes to pseudoscience-related topics. You can find the recap of Part I here.

View our upcoming schedule, or read our other #PWChat recaps, here.

Below are the highlights from the chat. You can read the full transcript here.

 

 

 

Question 1

Q1: What are your thoughts on #aromatherapy? Any proven health benefits? Pros? Cons?#PWChat

— Physician’s Weekly (@physicianswkly) October 25, 2017

A1. No evidence for its benefit. Can help cam stress in some people. #PWchat https://t.co/HKmcf0sE6w

— Linda Girgis, MD (@DrLindaMD) October 25, 2017

Q1 as a replacement for EBM, #Aromatherapy is useless, bc diseases and injuries aren’t influenced by how nice one smells /2 #pwchat

— Matthew Loxton (@mloxton) October 25, 2017


Question 2

Q2: What are your thoughts on #vitamin supplements? Any proven health benefits? Pros? Cons?#PWChat

— Physician’s Weekly (@physicianswkly) October 25, 2017

A2. Some have good benefits, some just hype. One example, vitamin D has shown many benefits in bone and heart health. #PWchat https://t.co/EWffeQhg8l

— Linda Girgis, MD (@DrLindaMD) October 25, 2017

A2. People falsely believe that if its a vitamin it is safe. This is not always the case. #PWchat https://t.co/EWffeQhg8l

— Linda Girgis, MD (@DrLindaMD) October 25, 2017

A2 I take a women’s OPti-womans multi-vitamin each day. I have an iron-deficiency & I feel it helps. #PWchat

— ShereeseM, MS/MBA (@ShereesePubHlth) October 25, 2017

1/2 There is good scientific data on many supplements (not often seen in USA!) BUT real issue is quality control–>#PWChat

— Nicholas DiNubile MD (@drnickUSA) October 25, 2017

2/2 Real issue w/ Vits/Supps is quality control as they don’t need to meet label claims! No over site. #BuyerBeware BlanksBeingSold #PWChat

— Nicholas DiNubile MD (@drnickUSA) October 25, 2017


Question 3

Q3: How do patients get sucked into following a type of #pseudoscience?#PWChat

— Physician’s Weekly (@physicianswkly) October 25, 2017

A3. Often, they have a health problem that traditional medicine is not helping. #pwchat https://t.co/45Gd4CxiyJ

— Linda Girgis, MD (@DrLindaMD) October 25, 2017

A3. Many “experts” sell products so people believe what they are saying. #PWchat https://t.co/45Gd4CxiyJ

— Linda Girgis, MD (@DrLindaMD) October 25, 2017

Q3 by trust in tribal leaders and image of what “people like us” do. #psuedoscience is a cultural spandrel #pwchat

— Matthew Loxton (@mloxton) October 25, 2017


Question 4

Q4: How can clinicians address #pseudoscience with their patients, including potential harms?#PWChat

— Physician’s Weekly (@physicianswkly) October 25, 2017

A4. Ask them what they are taking and bring in all the bottles. Show them the evidence. #PWchat https://t.co/XG0Vn2FJNw

— Linda Girgis, MD (@DrLindaMD) October 25, 2017

Q4 by engaging with the community, holding information sessions, countering bogus claims, and being engaged guides #pwchat

— Matthew Loxton (@mloxton) October 25, 2017


Question 5

Q5: How do you explain to patients the difference between causation & correlation, & other ways to really understand study results?#PWChat

— Physician’s Weekly (@physicianswkly) October 25, 2017

Q5 only a small number of pop are swayed by evidence. Vast majority are influenced by cioture and authority. Many get worse w facts #pwchat

— Matthew Loxton (@mloxton) October 25, 2017

A5. I usually stress the number of subjects n the study. If they see one with 15 subjects, it is not reliable. #PWchat https://t.co/kHWaX1WTNI

— Linda Girgis, MD (@DrLindaMD) October 25, 2017


Question 6

Q6: How can clinicians help patients find reliable sources for medical information?#PWChat

— Physician’s Weekly (@physicianswkly) October 25, 2017

A6. I have a few references that I give patients the link. #PWchat https://t.co/lKRe7Hvk4L

— Linda Girgis, MD (@DrLindaMD) October 25, 2017

Q6 by guiding them. #pwchat

— Matthew Loxton (@mloxton) October 25, 2017


Question 7

Q7: What can clinicians do on a wider scale to spread the word about the dangers of #pseudoscience & those who tout it (eg, @DrOz)?#PWChat

— Physician’s Weekly (@physicianswkly) October 25, 2017

A7. Speak out! Those spreading pseudoscience are speaking out and people are believing them. @DrOz #PWchat https://t.co/LoeeFKQItt

— Linda Girgis, MD (@DrLindaMD) October 25, 2017

Q7 use social media like this chat, conduct community health “fireside discussions”, and engage directly with celebs #pwchat

— Matthew Loxton (@mloxton) October 25, 2017

 


Question 8

Q8: What can we do w/ docs who sell #supplements that “boost the immune system,” are “better than what can be bought elsewhere”? #PWChat

— Physician’s Weekly (@physicianswkly) October 25, 2017

A8. I honestly do not believe physicians should be selling these products. It is a conflict of interest. #PWchat https://t.co/hoY9MglMag

— Linda Girgis, MD (@DrLindaMD) October 25, 2017

A8. Refine anti-kickback laws to include the sale of supplements. #PWchat https://t.co/hoY9MglMag

— Linda Girgis, MD (@DrLindaMD) October 25, 2017